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UBS

U

Interviewee

182 Project Leader

Team Advantages

Team Disadvantages

1, 4

Project Outcome

Successful

Industry

Financial

Location

London

Team Risk Tolerance

Low

Team Dynamics

TeamDynamics_FunandProductive

Company

UBS


Interestingly enough, the first project with that bank, it's funny because it was a very high manager in the bank said, "I'm interested in innovation, and I'm interested in our bank becoming more innovative." IDEO usually says, " Great, we can help you become more innovative." There, I've stopped saying innovative. [8519]
"What's going on here? Why are you bringing in a consultant? I'm doing my job just fine. We're making lots of money. We're successful. Why are you having someone come and innovate my area?" [8537]
And so in fact, they were quite passive-aggressive and negative clients, come to think of it, in terms of being supportive of our work, or giving us research information, that kind of thing. [8511],[8536]
Anyway, "We can help you do that. The best way to do that is to start with a project as an example. Let's do a piece of work to show you how our process works, how we are innovative, and how it could be relative to you, and then we can start thinking about changing your organization to be that way." We did this project on credit cards with them. There was a very high-level sponsor who was keen about IDEO, keen about innovation, and keen to try the project on credit cards. They're the ones who selected it. Meanwhile, the credit card guys, down several levels in the organization, were kind of like, "What's going on here? Why are you bringing in a consultant? I'm doing my job just fine. We're making lots of money. We're successful. Why are you having someone come and innovate my area?" And so in fact, they were quite passive-aggressive and negative clients, come to think of it, in terms of being supportive of our work, or giving us research information, that kind of thing. [8517],[8520]
Meanwhile, the credit card guys, down several levels in the organization, were kind of like, "What's going on here? Why are you bringing in a consultant? I'm doing my job just fine. We're making lots of money. We're successful. Why are you having someone come and innovate my area?" And so in fact, they were quite passive-aggressive and negative clients, come to think of it, in terms of being supportive of our work, or giving us research information, that kind of thing. [8525]
The project ended up being, I think, quite successful and unique, because we were able to come up with something that was very, very different. It was interesting, because they wanted us to be disruptive. I've learned since then that the word disruptive in a banking or a business context is not necessarily good. Disrupting a market is, I guess, good, if you are the disruptor, and you're well prepared to do it, but it's hard if the disruption is actually to your systems or if the disruption isn't quite ... I mean, if you were one of the established players in a market, disrupting the market isn't necessarily very good, absolutely, and so we learned a little bit about that, but we basically came up with this unique idea, and to a layperson, it doesn't sound that unique, but to the Swiss market, it was pretty interesting. [8508],[8521]
Because of our relationship with the higher level management, we were able to get them to commit to trying it out in a market, in the market. It's been really successful that way, in that normally, they would have analyzed this new idea and said, "We don't have enough data because it's so different than everything else, so we can't actually analyze it. Therefore, we can't create a business case. Therefore, we can't do anything about this. Therefore, thank you very much for your work, IDEO, but we're going to put this on a shelf." Because of our relationship with the higher level people and the sponsor, basically, for the project, we were able to get some traction, and they were able to try things in a different way, and say, "Okay, they have no precedent for this kind of thing. We can't make a business case. We're a bank. We usually only make business cases to do projects. We're going to try things differently." [8531],[8533],[8526]
It was a big organizational lesson, a big process lesson, that kind of thing, and it's in process. I think the hard part is this stuff takes a very long time. It took us 12 weeks to come up with the idea and present it quite nicely, and then it takes a year and a half to put it into a pilot, a test market, where 300 people try it out, because a banking product is unique in that it's not quite like, "Oh, here's a piece of technology. We've made a prototype of this recording device. We'll give it to 100 students and see how it goes." It's more like, if it's a banking product, it has to actually work. A credit card has to work in every machine in the world, and it has to be a real credit card, so prototyping, or piloting something like that, is quite a lot more traumatic than you first think. That's been an example of something that's been quite successful. [8509],[8514],[8516],[8528]
Then of course, that project has snowballed into other projects with the same client, and because we're little by little learning about different parts of their organization, we've had a lot of success that way. The other project we've done with the same organization is on their customer service experience, basically. That has been very different in the kind of project it is, because it's about a one-on-one service that you provide. As you can imagine, with any organization, especially a large bank, if you are providing a one-on-one service, and you have thousands of employees, and hundreds of thousands of customers, the number of one-on-one types of service that people get is millions of different kinds of experiences, and trying to design a consistent experience, or trying to design a conversation between people, which is essentially what it's coming down to, is how do you get trust with your client or customer? It's a very abstract problem to try to design, actually. [8506]
"We're going to start to treat our customers in a different way, and we're going to try to meet their needs in this new way, and we've all decided to do this, and here are the way we're going to try to do it." [8539],[8538]
What we learned with this project is that fundamentally, the whole bank needs to decide, "We're going to start to treat our customers in a different way, and we're going to try to meet their needs in this new way, and we've all decided to do this, and here are the way we're going to try to do it." That would be the truly most successful outcome of that project, would have been, the whole bank says, "Hey, we've got a whole new way of talking and listening to our customers," but in fact, that kind of initiative, that would be a pretty big deal for a very large bank to take on, everything from their outward-facing advertising down to how do their employees interact with their customers? Most organizations have undergone other initiatives like that, and also the market, in case you haven't been aware in the last couple years, has not been very good for banks, and so for them to focus on something other than the fact that the world's finances are going down the toilet [8507]
No, I think they've been generally very successful, given the constraints. I mean, like with the customer service project with UBS, I mean, UBS is at the top of the list of banks that were in trouble for a while, and getting a lot of negative press, and in fact, still the most profitable bank in the world, but still getting a lot of negative press with the credit crunch and that kind of thing. The other thing that could be interesting that probably not a lot of people have talked to you about with UBS is that all along, all of our work with them, there's been this underlying interest in how do they become more innovative as an organization, and the problem is that banks are fundamentally not that innovative. They're about conservatism, especially a Swiss bank. It's about privacy and conservatism, and control, and innovation requires openness and things out of your control a little bit, and trying things before you know if they're successful. [8513],[8522],[8532]
All of the attitudes about being creative are not very Swiss bank, basically. The overlap between those two is not big. All along they've been interested in being more innovative, and so all along we've learned from this series of projects about how they conduct their work and why they aren't creative like we are, because they are so driven by numbers. They're so driven by presumptions around numbers and business cases, and that kind of thing, and they don't really know how to quantify people needs and people attitudes and that kind of thing. Yeah, they do bring in people into the equation, but they use typical, traditional quantitative market research, where they try to take all of the nuances and complexities of people and turn them into statistics. "33.5% of people said that they might somewhat be more interested in investing more money, or would be interested in this kind of new credit card or that kind of new thing as well." [8512]
why they aren't creative like we are, because they are so driven by numbers. [8540]
[8523]
Then with the client's side, we always had a very clear sponsor, the person who's paying for the work, but then underneath that was the group who was responsible for implementing credit cards, who didn't really feel comfortable that we were on their turf. I'd say that they weren't the official decision-maker on our project, but they would have a lot of influence, so I'm not quite sure exactly how you'd divide that. [8535]
Well, the credit card project, let's see, here it was just a core team of four, and in terms of decision-makers, I guess just me as the project leader. When it comes down to it, the project manager is effectively making a lot of the decisions. Now I'm in the practice, so you can go to the practice for questions or support or guidance, if things are going wrong, but in general, you can take their advice or not. That sounds quite extreme, but that was a successful project, and the practice was very supportive, and so everything was going well, and nobody disagreed, so I guess in terms of decision-making, everybody was sort of in line with tone decision that we were making [8529]
Well, the credit card project, let's see, here it was just a core team of four, and in terms of decision-makers, I guess just me as the project leader. When it comes down to it, the project manager is effectively making a lot of the decisions. Now I'm in the practice, so you can go to the practice for questions or support or guidance, if things are going wrong, but in general, you can take their advice or not. That sounds quite extreme, but that was a successful project, and the practice was very supportive, and so everything was going well, and nobody disagreed, so I guess in terms of decision-making, everybody was sort of in line with tone decision that we were making. [8515]
"Thou shalt try this new credit card," they would be like, "Sure, okay," but in a real passive-aggressive kind of, "We're not going to put too many resources on it. We're not really going to provide you with any real data. We're not going to help you help us." [8541],[8542],[8543]
I mean, if somebody very senior says, "Thou shalt try this new credit card," they would be like, "Sure, okay," but in a real passive-aggressive kind of, "We're not going to put too many resources on it. We're not really going to provide you with any real data. We're not going to help you help us." They can make a decision which is taken by somebody else not successful because they don't want to participate or collaborate. [8524],[8527]
"The answer will come at some point," kind of way, and then the other senior people on the project wanted to work in a more rigorous sort of, "Let's figure out what we need to get done and when," kind of way, and those personalities clashed quite significantly on the project. [8544]
I haven't talked too much about that. I'm sure somebody else has, but there was a bit of conflict on that project internally at IDEO because it was very fuzzy [8545]
There were too many people who disagreed with the direction of that project, and so there was a lot of conflict in house. I haven't talked too much about that. I'm sure somebody else has, but there was a bit of conflict on that project internally at IDEO because it was very fuzzy. It wasn't really clear what we were going to deliver. The project manager tends to work in a very abstract, fuzzy, "The answer will come at some point," kind of way, and then the other senior people on the project wanted to work in a more rigorous sort of, "Let's figure out what we need to get done and when," kind of way, and those personalities clashed quite significantly on the project. [8518],[8534]
I'm a huge fan of the embedded team member. [8546]
I'm a huge fan of the embedded team member. They're difficult. They're a pain in the rear. They require a lot of hand-holding, especially at the beginning, and then especially at the end, when they were sort of mentally checking out from the project, but in the middle, I think they're one of the reasons our relationship with UBS has been as successful as it has been, because they, one-on-one, were able to see what it is that we do and how much passion we bring to the project work, and how we are working really collaboratively and strategically to help them be successful. [8510],[8530]
Okay. Well, a project that went really well in terms of the results and...that's really hard for me to say something went bad, cause I'm still a junior, and everything seems to be going so well, you know? I'm doing an M.A. video, I came straight from a B.A., didn't do an M.A. Basically I could be doing an M.A. now, but instead of by day, learning everything here, sharing so much knowledge with some of the best designers in the world. So for me to say that something's gone negatively, I can't really think much. If I'm being really picky, it is one of the strongest projects in the year has gone through. And I enjoyed it a lot. But it didn't really devote much of my product design side of it, that's what I'm trying to do at the moment. Everyone knows I'm very flexible, and leadership will come as I stay here longer, but you kind of forget, some people kind of forget that I'm actually a product designer. [7971]
Didn't go very well. Yeah, didn't go well because the subject-matter was quite hard, yes? No, I don't think it would have been just that, but it was classic, and it sounds so contrived, but it was a classic thing of too many chiefs and not enough ... It wasn't that we didn't have enough Indians. Too many people with decision-making ... Or too many senior people, I think, thrown at ... A tough problem, that we through a lot of senior people at. [8249]
Too many people with decision-making ... Or too many senior people, I think, thrown at ... A tough problem, that we through a lot of senior people at. [8279],[8280]
One of the big things I'm trying to do is, like I said, reinstate that sort of thing. But on a project, I recently read there was no product designer, but they knew I could aid the head graphic designer, cause I can develop graphics. And they know cause I'm a junior that I could get things done, sort out, you know, organize things. In the negative, in a way that's kind of a negative thing for me. It progressed me again, in the flexibility side of things, but didn't really progress me in the content side of it, my product design side of it. So, in a way, that's kind of negative, but...when there's a negative, there's always properly a positive. [7979]
Because a tough challenge, big client, really big client, important relationship, so instinctively, we threw some very experienced people and senior people at it. But then you get a bunch of senior people who seem like if you had that one senior person and then two more medium to junior people, of course their opinion is respected, but that person can make decisions, and those junior people will nearly always go with it, because I would. [8239],[8250],[8263],[8260]
This person's been here five, eight years, whatever. They know what they're talking about. No one feels like they express their position, don't get me wrong. It's not like we all do what the boss says, but at the same time, once all the discussion is over, and all the chat and the blah, blah, blah, we're still left with, "Okay, so what are we going to go with?" [8240],[8251],[8264]
Someone can make that decision, and it's fine, and no one really questions it, but when you get ... You had a project manager, but then you had other people on his team who'd been here, who were more senior, if you like. It's not about seniority, necessarily, but they were very experienced and they weren't going to let things slide if they saw something being done that they didn't think was right. [8241],[8252],[8265]
One of the first projects is on, where I still had that sort of that immature dude, and didn't know exactly how IDEO process worked. It felt a bit down, and maybe we all designed some stuff, and maybe there's one idea that I came up with, and I think it didn't go through or connect with everyone, and I felt disappointed. [7981]
It felt a bit down, and maybe we all designed some stuff, and maybe there's one idea that I came up with, and I think it didn't go through or connect with everyone, and I felt disappointed. [7983],[7982]
One of the first projects is on, where I still had that sort of that immature dude, and didn't know exactly how IDEO process worked. It felt a bit down, and maybe we all designed some stuff, and maybe there's one idea that I came up with, and I think it didn't go through or connect with everyone, and I felt disappointed. [7975],[7977]
So it was suddenly you're in a situation where you had this kind of tension. Some people have agreed with me on that. Some people said that they didn't think that was the problem, but I'm convinced it was. It was too many. When the project team was picked, a few people even sat there, said it. They said, "That's going to be painful," and it was. And it was. You know? That wasn't necessarily about talent or anything like that. All were really smart people, but they couldn't figure out how to work together. [8242],[8253],[8266]
Some people said that they didn't think that was the problem, but I'm convinced it was. [8281]
Yeah, so then you've got an embedded client which makes things ... When you're trying to be creative, you have intense times, but you can't be ... It's not like consulting where you're crunching numbers in a spreadsheet or doing financial models. You can't do that to ... You can do that, 11:00 at night, five nights a week, and just running sums and doing that kind of work. You can't be creative 12 hours a day. It's just not a healthy environment for it. You need space. [8235]
"Can we deal with this?" And we're going home at 6:00 or 7:00, and, "Do I stay? The client's here." [8282],[8283]
We had an embedded client, everyone was not quite sure how to deal with, wanting stuff done, and they were used to consultants living in their loft apartments, but working very hard. Not that we don't work hard, but just working crazy hours, and we were a little bit like, "Can we deal with this?" And we're going home at 6:00 or 7:00, and, "Do I stay? The client's here." [8236]
In the end though, the client totally got us, and they were wicked, and I became really friendly with one of them. Used to go out for dinner with her all the time. We were great friends in the end. But in the beginning, that certain issue, this embedded ... You're always on. You know? You're always on, as people would say. You're never in that relaxed, and that's when that whole permission to experiment thing, or permission to give yourself free time for a rest or whatever, doesn't happen, because it's very hard to articulate that when there's a client sitting in the room with you five days a week. [8237]
A lot of handholding in the beginning. Then I think we just built their trust, because we did good work, so the evidence was there in the end. At the beginning, they were used to this, and they were like, "Work." You know? But once they had their first couple of big meetings and it went well, and then they could see that we weren't ... [8271]
I think they just needed to see it. They were very rational people. "You put this in, and you get this out." So they were looking for that. Once the evidence of good work was produced, we instantly gained credibility, and they were like, "Okay, you do work a little bit differently, but the results are good." [8262],[8272]
Okay, you do work a little bit differently, but the results are good." [8284]
Also, just time. Lots of handholding, reassurance and things like that. They were with us for such a long time, that you didn't really have an option, because if you didn't become friends, then just never could have moved on. You know? It had to happen, in that sense. There became a time that we had to let go and be ourselves. You can't keep an act up forever. [8273]
As long as it's backed up, we probably could have gone out there, but we didn't find much say that we should do something risky. There's no point, you gotta make people happy. [7976]
I'm in his camp. Are you in her camp?" One of them, a project manager who had his legs cut out from under him, he'd almost become a puppet, because although he was the project manager [8285]
One of them, a project manager who had his legs cut out from under him [8286]
Yeah. No, it was cool. But still, that was a huge challenge. Then, yeah, just this weird ... Very big team as well, and people sitting in different camps. That whole, "Whose camp are you in?" "I'm in his camp. Are you in her camp?" One of them, a project manager who had his legs cut out from under him, he'd almost become a puppet, because although he was the project manager, there were other senior people that were saying that [8261]
Yeah. No, it was cool. But still, that was a huge challenge. Then, yeah, just this weird ... Very big team as well, and people sitting in different camps. That whole, "Whose camp are you in?" "I'm in his camp. Are you in her camp?" One of them, a project manager who had his legs cut out from under him, he'd almost become a puppet, because although he was the project manager, there were other senior people that were saying that ... There wasn't a good balance between them. The working-styles were so different. One person was, I thought ... People aren't going to hear this, right? [8243],[8254],[8274]
Then the other one was far too rigid, and not willing to try new things, and there wasn't a happy middle ground. [8288]
There was this, one of them was too far-out there, and too experimental, and too fluffy, if you like [8287]
Yeah. There was this, one of them was too far-out there, and too experimental, and too fluffy, if you like. Then the other one was far too rigid, and not willing to try new things, and there wasn't a happy middle ground. [8255]
But one was senior-enough that they would just go, "I'm not going to present that," or just not ... It just wasn't a good environment, you know? [8248]
Yeah, it was perfect. We did a work-life balance thing, so it was all about leaving...start at nine-thirty, lunch, little bit of fun during the day, and then finishing at six. [7972]
But Alan said, how are we gonna get inspired. It was all about field testing, the content that was already there. [7984]
Totally. Yeah. I know projects where they've worked on individually, where they've both been incredibly successful. [8256]
Because that project would have been a dream, or not a dream, but could have been turned into the dream project, if someone made the decision and removed one of them. [8289]
If he, the project manager, was ... Because that project would have been a dream, or not a dream, but could have been turned into the dream project, if someone made the decision and removed one of them. It wasn't so much that one way would have been the better way and one way would have been a worse way. Whatever. We just wanted someone to make the decision about what way it was going to be. [8257],[8267]
We just wanted someone to make the decision about what way it was going to be. [8291],[8290]
It was about two days a week, really. But previously they were there three to four days a week, I think. So, yeah, they'd come over, we'd give them stuff to do, and work with us, and that's where we died off, to the point that we were just getting stuff ready to go out in the field test. But they were working along us while it was all happening. [7973]
So we took this fluffy line of trying to ... They never met in the middle. You just wanted someone to come in and say, "Okay, for right or wrong, this is good for this reason, but this is the road we're going to travel," and then it would have been fine because at least you'd have a road to travel, rather than constantly fighting between two different roads, you know? [8247],[8270]
They never met in the middle. You just wanted someone to come in and say, "Okay, for right or wrong, this is good for this reason, but this is the road we're going to travel," [8294],[8292],[8293]
Yeah, she's great. I think it was also her first project lead, and because it was like a organizational project really, of getting these thing out to field test, there wasn't much more than, the client was already on board. There wasn't much client looking after and pampering, saying that was why they gave it to her, I think. She's a good organizer, and she got it all done, and we made a great margin. [7974]
Yeah, she's great. I think it was also her first project lead, and because it was like a organizational project really, of getting these thing out to field test, there wasn't much more than, the client was already on board. There wasn't much client looking after and pampering, saying that was why they gave it to her, I think. She's a good organizer, and she got it all done, and we made a great margin. But yeah, we get on great now, cause she felt bad sort of for bringing me on the project, cause there's no product design to be done, or any design. But she knew that I could get things done, and I was the sort of person that could help her on that project. So she asked, she kind of came up and said, do you mind working on this project for a second, and I said, hey it's cool, that'll help me in my flexibility side of things. Show services I can dabble in that sort of things. So it's cool. But yeah, we're cool now. [7980]
I think it was discussed that someone would come in and run it. Someone more senior. But, that's when we faced this issue, that we had clients embedded, and politically it would have been a bit tough midway through that you're going to be seeing someone new tomorrow, and this person won't be in the project-space anymore. [8258]
n a bit tough midway through that you're going to be seeing someone new tomorrow, and this person won't be in the project-space anymore. [8295]
Since you call people I never worked with, but you get to know them, you get to work with them, and you bond relationships so quickly though. [7985]
We're not very good at that, at IDEO, at feedback. It was recognized, I think, midway through. [8245]
So, we're all quite, not naive, but still quite junior. They're not that. Two of them and the project leader, they're not, they're all middle age, seniors. But I was the most junior. We're all still quite young in the IDEO terms. [7986]
Yeah, really good. All of us supposedly had been there under year. Been the idea, well around a year, under a year. So, we're all quite, not naive, but still quite junior. They're not that. Two of them and the project leader, they're not, they're all middle age, seniors. But I was the most junior. We're all still quite young in the IDEO terms. [7978]
Earlier, by the people on the project, then the senior people, I think, picked up on it midway through, and then they tried to manage it, basically. [8268]
I think it became a burden on the project about four or five weeks in. [8275]
Oh yeah, totally. I was yet to be proven right, but I spotted that it was an issue at the beginning, and so did some- [8276]
Yeah, and it was such a big team. You can't expect that ... We are friends here, to a certain degree, and we do work at IDEO, so much of us share a common ideal or whatever, but you can't expect 10 people to be put in a room and all of a sudden you're just going to be pals for the next 12 weeks and all agree with each other. It just doesn't work like that. [8277]
But then you have a lack of clarity of, who was the leader? That person was the leader on paper, but that person's kind of ... [8259]
Then we, the more junior people on the team, got treated like kids, because we were then removed from the creative decision-making process, and we went from a collaboration to two people that were struggling to get on, having conversations outside of the project [8297],[8298]
Then we, the more junior people on the team, got treated like kids, because we were then removed from the creative decision-making process, and we went from a collaboration to two people that were struggling to get on, having conversations outside of the project. We were like the children, and we became frustrated, because you treat people like children and you've got children, you know? [8244]
We were like the children, and we became frustrated, because you treat people like children and you've got children, you know? [8296]
It just felt that it was just a labored process. We got through, and it was good work in the end, or reasonably good work, and then it became really good work, because what happened was they finished that phase and then that project stopped for a period of six weeks, and in that time, the team dispersed and a new team got given the third phase. A new team. [8234]
We got through, and it was good work in the end, or reasonably good work, and then it became really good work [8299]
think it was always cloudy, what we were going to deliver. It was half the problem. [8300]
Like, "This is what we're going to deliver. No, it's not." Lots of, they had a huge number of internal stakeholders that they had to buy in, and then you'd get buy-in from so-and-so down one corridor, but then you'd need someone else down another corridor [8303],[8301],[8302]
Like, "This is what we're going to deliver. No, it's not." Lots of, they had a huge number of internal stakeholders that they had to buy in, and then you'd get buy-in from so-and-so down one corridor, but then you'd need someone else down another corridor in Zurich the next week, and then they would say it should be about this, and then the classic thing in banking culture, everyone's pandering to their seniors. So one minute it would be about this, and then someone else senior says this, so then you'd get them pandering to what they wanted. Lots of toing-and-froing. It was never totally clear. [8278]
Were time and budget a major issue? I don't think they were. [8238]
Yeah, time-level was tough with that. It was tough to make that work. But we had to be very tactical, and that was part of the thing that drove us to work the way we did. We didn't have time to noodle language for two weeks. It was like, we need to have these insights done in 24 hours, so we did. We set ourselves quite ambitious goals, and that was driven party by time and financial constraints. [8269]
And one of the younger, more junior members of their embedded team, a girl called Kelly, she was great, and she lived in West London and at the time I lived in Notting Hill, and we'd go out for Mexican food all the time and stuff, so it was cool. [8246]
Reference Tags
[8519] Lack of real innovation mandate,[8537] Status quo bias,[8511] Communication issues,[8536] Conservatism,[8517] Indecisive leadership,[8520] Lack of real innovation mandate,[8525] Internal changes/challenges,[8508] Appeal to novelty,[8521] Lack of real innovation mandate,[8531] Pro-innovation bias,[8533] Trust,[8526] Win-win conflict about ideas,[8509] Communicating ideas across domains,[8514] Decisive leadership,[8516] Great example - IDEO's Methods,[8528] Organizing effectively,[8506] Great example - Individual & Team outcomes for future efforts,[8539] Empathetic disposition,[8538] Listening disposition,[8507] Great example - Individual & Team outcomes for future efforts,[8513] Conservatism,[8522] Lack of real innovation mandate,[8532] Pro-innovation bias,[8512] Confirmation bias,[8540] Conservatism,[8523] Lack of real innovation mandate,[8535] Vague roles,[8529] Organizing effectively,[8515] Decisive leadership,[8541] Alignment,[8542] Lack of organizational encouragement,[8543] Lack of resources,[8524] Lack of real innovation mandate,[8527] Lack of resources,[8544] Irreconcilable differences,[8545] Internal changes/challenges,[8518] Indecisive leadership,[8534] Unresolved relationship conflict,[8546] Organizing effectively,[8510] Communicating ideas across domains,[8530] Organizing effectively,[7971] Anecdotal fallacy,[8249] Indecisive leadership,[8279] Reactance,[8280] Vague roles,[7979] Lack of challenging work,[8239] Authority bias,[8250] Indecisive leadership,[8263] Micromanaging,[8260] Yielding conflict about ideas,[8240] Authority bias,[8251] Indecisive leadership,[8264] Micromanaging,[8241] Authority bias,[8252] Indecisive leadership,[8265] Micromanaging,[7981] Yielding conflict about relationships,[7983] Alignment,[7982] Communication issues,[7975] Dismissive,[7977] Inexperience,[8242] Authority bias,[8253] Indecisive leadership,[8266] Micromanaging,[8281] Anecdotal fallacy,[8235] Alignment,[8282] Authority bias,[8283] Reactance,[8236] Alignment,[8237] Alignment,[8271] Trust,[8262] Empathetic disposition,[8272] Trust,[8284] Creative Confidence,[8273] Trust,[7976] Compromising conflict about ideas,[8285] Internal changes/challenges,[8286] Forceful conflict about relationships,[8261] Yielding conflict about ideas,[8243] Authority bias,[8254] Indecisive leadership,[8274] Unresolved relationship conflict,[8288] Conservatism,[8287] Lack of real innovation mandate,[8255] Indecisive leadership,[8248] Forceful conflict about ideas,[7972] Balanced workload pressure,[7984] Methodologically creative,[8256] Indecisive leadership,[8289] Hindsight bias,[8257] Indecisive leadership,[8267] Optimism,[8291] Alignment,[8290] Indecisive leadership,[7973] Communicating ideas across domains,[8247] Avoiding conflict about ideas,[8270] Avoiding conflict about relationships,[8294] Alignment,[8292] Indecisive leadership,[8293] Internal changes/challenges,[7974] Decisive leadership,[7980] Organizational encouragement,[8258] Indecisive leadership,[8295] Internal changes/challenges,[7985] Trust,[8245] Insufficient Feedback,[7986] Inexperience,[7978] Inexperience,[8268] Organizational encouragement,[8275] Unresolved relationship conflict,[8276] Unresolved relationship conflict,[8277] Unresolved relationship conflict,[8259] Indecisive leadership,[8297] Dismissive,[8298] Lack of trust,[8244] Dismissive,[8296] Unresolved relationship conflict,[8234] Great example - Individual & Team outcomes for future efforts,[8299] Resilience,[8300] Vague goals,[8303] Alignment,[8301] Communication issues,[8302] Indecisive leadership,[8278] Vague goals,[8238] Appropriate resources,[8269] Planning fallacy,[8246] Great example - Team Dynamics

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MADISON BARNETT
I get my inspiration from the fictional world. I’m a social geek. Completely exploit 24/365 catalysts for change whereas high standards in action items. Conveniently whiteboard multifunctional benefits without enabled leadership.
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