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SKT

S

Interviewee

179 Human Factors

Team Advantages

Team Disadvantages

0, 1

Project Outcome

Successful

Industry

Home electronics/cameras/TV/copiers

Location

London

Team Risk Tolerance

Low-medium

Team Dynamics

TeamDynamics_FunandProductive

Company

SKT


Yes, very, very different. And so, when I arrived in January, there was this whole discussion in the office about that everything was bogged down in research and a lot of the designers were feeling like, "Oh, I spend so much time thinking and not doing." And I think the HF team has been kind of labeled with this kind of "Research, Research" than "Design". And so, with the SKT one, it was really great, because I kind of came in and we were designing straight from the beginning of the sketching and everything and the whole team doing it and it was amazing how that really lifted you to see the design of specific designers really engaged with the project, because it wasn't seen as "HF phase", " design phase". [8324]
It was very much very integrated quickly. And that was really nice. Everyone kept commenting, "Oh, [inaudible 00:09:37]", and that was really, really nice, because as a team, together, we really wanted to do this let's design and think and understand all at the same time. And that was really nice. It's a very positive thing amongst the team. So, I'd say, for me, that was the biggest thing that stood out. A lot of people in the HF guys have been talking about this saying, "Let's start talking about this SKT project", about how we can design out front and about how that's good for inspiration, as well as going out and seeing and observing and talking to people. That's kind of really inspiring for the team internally. [8331],[8339],[8341]
"Okay, if you had this kind of remote control or this kind of TV interface, how would that change the way you behaved?" So, we started to use it for early on, sparking big thoughts, rather than coming up with those once we've seen people, so [8355]
It was really quite nice, considering the discussions that had been going on internally about how to start reframing this HF phase and getting out of that and reframing it as design research instead. [8357]
So, that was the one thing that I found very frustrating. I've got some some good design skills and abilities, but I've never quite been able to use those fully. So, that's kind of why coming Ideo was very nice and [inaudible 00:12:09] SKT project, I thought I wanted designers on the team and not just an HF person. We all felt like designers, so... That was like, for that project, really quite empowering, actually. It was really quite nice, considering the discussions that had been going on internally about how to start reframing this HF phase and getting out of that and reframing it as design research instead. [8325]
That was like, for that project, really quite empowering, actually. [8356]
Yeah, everything in the office was all products like remote controls and, in particular, this project was quite unusual for me to think I would still do this kind of work. But, yes, it was very, very different. So, I think, the way in which we think about things here and now is a lot broader because of that. Now I see it, when I come here now, we do think bigger extremes, where before, I felt, that we thought often within the boundaries of the actual product rather than thinking much broader about other extremes of behaviors and how that could influence our thinking. Where, now, I feel it seems to be much broader thinking. [8326]
Yeah, yeah. People are being so sensible now, I hear. But then you always have to [inaudible 00:14:23]. I was speaking to Paul Bennett when I first got here and said, "It's very different, like you haven't got your nutters. [8358]
That's a strange one actually, because it was a really awkward... A really unusual... Sorry, unusual in terms of western client collaboration, I'd say, but probably normal for Asian. We had a core project team that we were working with and that was our day to day communication. I would say there was one person on that team that was the decision maker within the next big cell of decision makers, the big wigs sitting at the top. So, he was the kind of linchpin between the two, but he was not always there, so then he had the sub core team that would be working on a day to day basis with us. They'd be kind of feeding, kind of like a ladder up and down and all the decisions. [8317],[8332],[8351]
So, from Ant and Steve on our project, it would go through various people. Safe to say, I think, four maximum different key decision makers on that team and then fed through and interpreted, sometimes incorrectly, through the smaller core team. So it was, I'd say, four people that make the decisions on their side through various filters both ways and then for us, Ant and Steve driving the process this end. [8307],[8333],[8352]
No, no. It was often... It took us some time to get to that. I think when decisions were needed to be made, we started kind of uncovering cracks in that process and they haven't fully explained that kind of decision process. [8327],[8353]
Eight weeks in when they started to pick our cracks in communication between them and thinking, "This is not quite running as smoothly." [8359]
Eight weeks in? Eight weeks in when they started to pick our cracks in communication between them and thinking, "This is not quite running as smoothly." And then kind of checking back and then creating down time for us, where we needed to use it, but they wanted to make decisions. [8308],[8334],[8354]
Big words, but big guts when it comes down to it. Huge, right at the beginning, you know, we were employing you because want big change. We want to really kind of push the boundaries and the big word to them was "differentiate" and in the market everything's the same. So, they really spoke very heavily about all of that, but as we moved through, they started stepping back from big decisions. "We're not ready to do that, we don't want to do that." So, our big ideas started being pinched and we had to reframe how we were thinking things because of that. [8328],[8345]
We're not ready to do that, we don't want to do that." So, our big ideas started being pinched and we had to reframe how we were thinking things because of that. [8360]
So, I would say, their willingness to take risks was actually... I would say, it changed. I would say, at the beginning, how they set the scene, I would say it was high. It then went to low as we started getting into the design details and manufacturing possibilities. And then, I would actually say, we managed to stop pushing them out again and explaining that if we do this, you differentiate, if we do this, you achieve this in the market. So, I think it was high, it dipped very low, and then we managed to push it back up again. [8304],[8346]
Low/medium, yeah. To get them to just push the boundaries a little bit forward and take a little bit more risk. But that did constrain the ways we did it. But, yeah, I think we dipped very low and then managed to start pushing them out again and getting them to understand where they could really make big gains through only making certain strategic decisions, instead of all of them. I think we were cherry picking the ones that would have the biggest impact on the user and there was also balance in terms of their manufacturing capabilities, where we felt that they would be comfortable to move forward as well. So, it was kind of a fine balancing act, I think. [8305],[8321],[8347]
But also, the expectations around the deliverable, I think, were potentially, our deliverable, was back in the guidelines. And I think maybe they saw it as a false specification [8361]
So I think some of the differences in handing over between the two offices. Something slipped through the net, I think, and we were having to deal with those on the fly, really, and kind of just managed those as we went. [8362]
There's some things that we would do a bit earlier on, instead of leaving it as it was and I think after me after trying to encourage them to push things forward, make decisions earlier on... But also, the expectations around the deliverable, I think, were potentially, our deliverable, was back in the guidelines. And I think maybe they saw it as a false specification. So I think some of the differences in handing over between the two offices. Something slipped through the net, I think, and we were having to deal with those on the fly, really, and kind of just managed those as we went. This was something about because we were handing over a kind semi finished sort of designed guideline. [8309],[8350]
And that wasn't kind of specked in as part of the product, but that's something, as a team, we all would've included. [8363]
We felt it was necessary that there was potentially an opportunity to have some kind of user testing to understand were we covered? It's just about what is right now, let's test and see whether that would work, part of the design and how we'll change that. And that wasn't kind of specked in as part of the product, but that's something, as a team, we all would've included. That was something we inanely encouraged the client that was a necessary part in the next stage of work that they would do to actually incorporate that, because we couldn't have passed it with the kind of project scope. [8329]
It's amazing when you hand over a project that's been defined by a different office. How differently, as a team, you'd do that and do things quite sort of different time frames of things and how long you'll spend on certain things, so, that was quite interesting. [8365],[8364]
So yeah, I think there was certain things that we would just do differently, just because we work differently. And I think it was... We did comment on those. It's amazing when you hand over a project that's been defined by a different office. How differently, as a team, you'd do that and do things quite sort of different time frames of things and how long you'll spend on certain things, so, that was quite interesting. Trying to fit in with the Palo Alto framework of scope of work. [8348],[8330]
I think, with that, we work closely with the BD guy out in the states to do that, so there was kind of a forehand over to the UK, over to the London office. But with someone with [inaudible 00:29:02] from the kind of Palo Alto office, so that he was always kind of a link in, because SKT originally had the conversations with the Palo Alto office and Charles, in particular. He remained kind of on the side of the project, I think we can maintain that connection. So, he'd already had a relationship with the company and had worked on previous projects, so he remained as kind of within the team as a check in point, would make regular calls, would kind of understand whether the SKT team was fully up to speed on what we were currently doing now. So it was kind of like a check in process. [8306],[8340],[8342]
I think potentially to keep the SKT team happy... Well, I don't know if it was actually that necessary, because I think we controlled the ups and downs and day to day changes of what happened in the project, so I'm not sure that was a complete necessary thing. I don't know how [crosstalk 00:30:06] felt about that. [8349]
There was a whole issue about the translation. There was one guy on the project, but very [inaudible 00:30:20] educated in America. And his personally feelings about how the design should be often clouded clear communication between the team. And so, he would drip feed. [8310],[8316],[8322],[8335]
There was one guy on the project, but very [inaudible 00:30:20] educated in America. And his personally feelings about how the design should be often clouded clear communication between the team. And so, he would drip feed. [8367],[8366],[8368]
Yeah and he would drip feed what he felt was necessary through to the rest of the client team, so that became another thing to deal with. We started to have to manage that. [8311]
Yeah and he would drip feed what he felt was necessary through to the rest of the client team, so that became another thing to deal with. We started to have to manage that. [8323],[8336]
And we thought we'd just explained that ten minutes ago, but he'd obviously hadn't included it in the discussion, so you'd be startled after a while to figure out he isn't being completely honest. [inaudible 00:31:22] in all translations. [8369],[8370],[8371]
He would taint it. So, that made communication lengthy and difficult, because someone in the team would then ask it in a kind of broken English, we would understand [8372]
He would taint it. So, that made communication lengthy and difficult, because someone in the team would then ask it in a kind of broken English, we would understand. And we thought we'd just explained that ten minutes ago, but he'd obviously hadn't included it in the discussion, so you'd be startled after a while to figure out he isn't being completely honest. [inaudible 00:31:22] in all translations. [8312],[8337]
And we've been given that project. It's great. Brilliant opportunity. I think the hard thing about it is that it's a Korean client, who are like, ridiculously demanding, all the time. They need validation for everything that you do. They need to validate it. So hierarchical, it's just unbelievable. [8100]
I think it got to the fact that on all the key important documents, we had them translated, because the guys at the top were making decisions... He would be feeding the documents through and translating them, so this would say this, that would say that. In the end, the ones that really were critical in the guys fully understanding our design thinking, we had those translated. [8313],[8338]
It's also a US project, so it's brought over from the US, so it's put very tight in the margins. [8129]
Yeah, internally here, so there was no misinterpretation. Everything that was on that, the CEO's would all have a clear understanding of what that was and so they could make a clear decision. So, that's kind of how we ended up resolving that particular sticky situation. [8314],[8344]
I would say that there wasn't enough... Because writing up the documentation was so lengthy to ensure that the right stuff was going through to the guys that mattered, because we'd been communicating with them on a day to day basis. It made things much more bogged down, in detail, then we would normally have, I'd say, with any other clients [inaudible 00:33:11] or wonder, didn't have that level of communication internally. And it added an extra element of us being more thorough with how we documented it and gave across our design thinking and thought processes. So, I'd say, that, in itself, started to... It kind of really was heavy on the project team. In terms of doing the work, but also explaining why they're doing it. It added another element, so... The rest of it, I'd say, if that hadn't been necessary, would have been a really well specked out, timely project. [8315]
Yeah, it's really, really good. Yeah. Fantastic project. Don't know what else to say about it, really. It's another project where we think, fuck, what a miserable piece of work. Why don't we just do it ourselves and sell it? Because they're gonna fuck it up. We've given this amazing design, right? And the problem is they don't know how to employ it. They don't know how it would take [inaudible 00:24:16]. And we help them with all that stuff. Of course we do. [8125]
If we can, and you wanna pay for it, we'll help them. And we'll help them succeed. But with Asian clients, they don't, they just go, oh, give me the project. That's it. There's your money. See you later, Ideal. [8101],[8118]
Fluctuation a lot, I'd say. From my side in particular, because they don't give much feedback. [8373]
Fluctuation a lot, I'd say. From my side in particular, because they don't give much feedback. They're not "this is really bad", "this is really good"... It's actually quite tough when you've worked on something and they don't actually give you any feedback. They just go, "Okay, that's fine." Then they kind of [inaudible 00:35:15] agree to it, but they don't pass any comment to you. It's really demoralizing when you've worked your back side off and you don't get anything from them. You get no emotional connection, so I'd say emotional connection's very low. And there was a lot of drip feeding and hand holding and explaining about what we're doing throughout. So, I'd say actually time spent with them was quite lengthy, but a complete lack of emotional connection with them, which is quite demoralizing. So, yeah, I think that'd probably be the way of summarizing it. [8318]
It's really demoralizing when you've worked your back side off and you don't get anything from them. You get no emotional connection, so I'd say emotional connection's very low. [8374]
It's very hard to have any kind of relationship, build a relationship with them and get a trust going. Essentially, they're manufacturers, and they go, just give us the [inaudible 00:24:41], and then they make it wrong. [8143],[8144]
It's very hard to have any kind of relationship, build a relationship with them and get a trust going. Essentially, they're manufacturers, and they go, just give us the [inaudible 00:24:41], and then they make it wrong. And it's a nightmare. And they do it all wrong. The design intent's completely lost. And they end up with this shit design, and they go, oh, well, Ideal designed it, shoot. And it's because they haven't implemented it properly and it's a big problem. [8140]
, I think that's probably the frustrating thing for us, as a team. They didn't do that, all the comments would always be talked about and how frustrating that was not to hear their feedback, their personal kind of beliefs about the project and how they think it went. [8375]
I think, at last minute, I think it could've only kind of been different if the client core team felt confident in their ability to pass judgment and make comments. I felt because they were the middle playing field between management and us, that's all they ever did was kind of pass information and feed between the two sources. So, I think if they would've been able to have a position of value on the team and I think that would've changed then greatly. I think that was probably the problem, they couldn't do that. And yeah, I think that's probably the frustrating thing for us, as a team. They didn't do that, all the comments would always be talked about and how frustrating that was not to hear their feedback, their personal kind of beliefs about the project and how they think it went. They always skirted around that, even when kind of pushed. No one would ever say anything, so I think that was quite demoralizing as a team, not to hear that. [8319]
Because they've just done this big million dollar project, and then all of the sudden, Ideal's going, oh, if you give us another hundred grand, we'll help you implement it as well. And it just doesn't settle. They're all just trying to get their heads around the design, the whole team's going off now to start to make it, and it's just like, it's just so hard to get anybody in the organization who's got the clarity to actually go, yeah, we do need this, and I'm gonna take charge of it. I'm gonna liaise with Ideal and make sure that our teams are doing the right things. I'm gonna check in, we're gonna send review documents, [inaudible 00:25:51]. Cause in a way, it's reversing the relationship. We've been sending documents to them all the time, and they've been going oh, we don't like this idea, oh, we do like, can you change this? Can you change that? [8102],[8126],[8113],[8141]
Great. Ant's easy to get on with. As a team, we're all very different. All very [inaudible 00:37:39], their some real different characters. Like Graham, for example, he's a very, very different character than I. We got on very well. And you had , he's very, very different to all of us. We actually gelled very well. And Ant is very much like, he wants you to take control of your stuff and do it and him to add value where he can and I think that's really nice. He kind of empowers you to do stuff rather than take that away from you, so that worked really well. [8343]
But all we're essentially asking the client to do now is send us a document every two weeks on how the development's going and we'll review it, and we'll give comments and suggestions on how to do it. And clients don't like doing that. It's a completely fuckin' weird position to put them in. [8114]
Really good, actually. Fun. We were able to crack jokes and make each other laugh under the most extreme pressure and tension. I think, when you can do that, you've really nailed a good project team. [8376],[8377]
Really good, actually. Fun. We were able to crack jokes and make each other laugh under the most extreme pressure and tension. I think, when you can do that, you've really nailed a good project team. When it can be quite, people are really working on [inaudible 00:38:37] and when we can do that, then that was really good. So I think that was probably the highlight of the project team, actually. Actually, on the way to Korea two weeks ago, we were all quite nervous about doing the presentation and we just had an e-mail sent through from someone over in the states and we'd all found it quite funny and humorous and we'd all be making internal jokes about it and that was the one thing that I think kept us going throughout that week of the presentation. We all just kept cracking the same old jokes. I think that worked. That was really important for keeping the team going, having a good laugh. [8320]
No, they're not used to it, but it's that collaborative element that's really important that clients just don't do. And that's why they fall down all the time, cause they can't... [8103]
And the client's side, again, we had to find the presentation, like, two weeks ago, and there was like a CTO and CEO from the, every fuckin' department in South Korea Telecom. It was crazy. There was like 40 people in the room. So I don't know, it's very hard. I mean, there's two people, essentially, that we're hearing decisions off, in the [inaudible 00:27:45]. But again, it's very hierarchical, so really, decisions don't get made - so hierarchies - the guy who makes the decision is the boss, the big boss. He's the one that... he has to be told every decision. That's why it's so hard [inaudible 00:28:01]. [8127],[8142]
It's me and Steve, really, on the big decisions. The two of us. [8112]
It's worse. I mean, European companies are much more wont to risk, but the Asian companies are just like - especially companies that produce computers and mobiles and stuff, they're all in this race. They're all competing with each other like, we have to get product out, next month, next quarter. We have to get the same features as Samsung's got. We have to get the same things as LG's got. It's just this, they're all just self-perpetuating, sort of, thing. [8119],[8135]
Apple [inaudible 00:28:46] at doing this. It's just going right, let's step back, let's spend five years or something, let's develop the iPhone, and then put it out, right, and it'll blow everyone away, and it did. But Asian companies don't do that. They don't stop their order and go right, we're gonna really think about this now. We're gonna do something that's really worthwhile, because they're all in this horrible, like, you know, let's just make loads of shit, that's all there is. [8120]
Millions of companies just make millions of different devices that all look exactly the same, and they're all shit. And they'll user desirability is just completely, not even a part of the thing. [8145]
It was pretty clear. I mean it was a pretty tame designer, [inaudible 00:29:48] TV in a remote control. It was a really clean brief. But in fact, we changed it all along, but it was a clear brief from the start. [8136]
Yeah, it became less clear, but it didn't become less clear, it's just that they often try to change it. But it's still very clear in the brief. In my eyes, it's still very clear what we're doing. Yeah. [8137]
ou'll sit in three hour conference calls on the phone with them, right? And there'll be one person speaks from their side, but there'll be eight of them sitting 'round the phone. They don't say anything. It's this whole opinion thing. They don't say anything. [8148],[8147],[8146]
Very fucking funny. They don't talk. They don't say anything. Weirdest conference calls in the world, right, you won't believe it, mate. You'll sit in three hour conference calls on the phone with them, right? And there'll be one person speaks from their side, but there'll be eight of them sitting 'round the phone. They don't say anything. It's this whole opinion thing. They don't say anything. [8104],[8107]
And you're always like, you feel daft, cause you're always asking, are you all right? What do you think? You show them stuff, and they have no opinion. And you're just like, well, what do you think? And they go, oh, I think the CEO might think it's a bit, like, it's not colorful enough. Or they'll always talk from someone else's point of view. So you can never get that, well, what do you think? Do you like the fucking design or what? [8115]
And you're just like, well, what do you think? And they go, oh, I think the CEO might think it's a bit, like, it's not colorful enough. Or they'll always talk from someone else's point of view. So you can never get that, well, what do you think? Do you like the fucking design or what? [8149],[8150]
They won't tell you. So it's very weird. [8116]
On the last one... the trouble with a lot of Asian clients is that they just treat you like a supplier. [8108],[8121]
Do you know what I mean? You go into their board rooms, and stuff, and the CEO, he'll go up, won't even look at you. He'll sit right at the front. It's a room the size of this, with all these fuckin' [inaudible 00:35:03] microphones. You gotta talk in a mic, right? He'll sit right at the front. Everyone else will sit right at the back of the room. Anybody who's not important will sit at the back, right? [8109],[8122]
He'll sit right at the front. Everyone else will sit right at the back of the room. Anybody who's not important will sit at the back, right? [8151],[8152]
So it's just this ridiculous kind of hierarchy. And then the main guy, they'll all bow, and then they'll scuttle off somewhere, to the sides of the room. Any you'll be like, well, where's anyone? Please come down, we can't see. You've got a screen this big. And it's very hard to communicate on a basic level. On a basic level, it's impossible. [8105],[8110],[8123]
And they just don't respond. So you go, like, come down, you have to come closer cause you need to see this screen. We've got TV here, we're gonna [inaudible 00:35:44] one. And they're like, come down! They won't say anything, cause they're not allowed to say anything. And then you have to look at the main guy, like, can they come down, and he'll go like, yeah, and he'll go like that. And then they'll all come down. Absolutely mad. [8106],[8111]
We've got TV here, we're gonna [inaudible 00:35:44] one. And they're like, come down! They won't say anything, cause they're not allowed to say anything. And then you have to look at the main guy, like, can they come down, and he'll go like, yeah, and he'll go like that. And then they'll all come down. Absolutely mad. [8153]
I think it's great. Again, I'm working with people who I know very well, so we know each other very well, and that helps. I've been lucky, I guess. I'm mostly a person you may trust a lot. It's fine. Trust's a big thing. You've gotta trust your team. You've gotta empower them to do their own thing. Once you've got a level of trust set, I think [inaudible 00:36:59]. [8138]
m mostly a person you may trust a lot. It's fine. Trust's a big thing. [8154]
Yeah, of course it does, yeah, it's like boyfriend-girlfriend, isn't it? You know each other well, you just know how to start things. You don't have to have your dating period. [8117]
It depends how honest you've been about it. If you've held it inside and you haven't talked about it at the project review or something, then you have this deep-seeded resentment for somebody in the team, then that's gonna be a nightmare. You're gonna have a problem. But again, I think, being professional about it doesn't allow that kind of thing, and you have to just get on otherwise, there's team members I've worked with before that've been quite intimidating. You know, they've been very experienced, and they've been very opinionated, and you're just like, okay, now, hold on a minute, I don't actually agree. Can't you just slow down a bit? [8130]
there's team members I've worked with before that've been quite intimidating. You know, they've been very experienced, and they've been very opinionated, and you're just like, okay, now, hold on a minute, I don't actually agree. Can't you just slow down a bit? [8124]
And you've been intimidated by them. And then if you get resourced with them again, clearly you're gonna think, oh, fuck, I'm not gonna do that again. But If you've voiced that concern to them, I know it's hard to do that, but you have to. You have to say, look, you know, in the project review, I think this bit didn't go very well because we didn't talk openly about the ways that we're gonna work together. That's how most people do it, actually. [8128]
I think this bit didn't go very well because we didn't talk openly about the ways that we're gonna work together. That's how most people do it, actually. [8155],[8156]
Important to talk. Each time there is resentments. [8131]
I think you would just have conflicts, because you all have to take a role. And normally a conflict arises where people are overlapping too much on certain roles. [8132]
So, you know, if you've got two interaction designers working together, you normally have one who's doing documentation, the other one is doing creative visualization. You don't have both of them doing visualization because they'll just go like, no, my idea's better, I like this better than yours. [8133]
You don't have both of them doing visualization because they'll just go like, no, my idea's better, I like this better than yours. [8157]
They'll just fight the whole time. And if you have someone on the team who wants to be a project manager when you're the project manager, clearly you're gonna get into an area of conflict where roles are... you've just gotta define the roles. That's hard, I know. I've never been in a really bad situation where my role has been... actually... [8134]
Great. We were all friends with each other, really. It was good. I mean, we got a new VHF girl who it was her first project, first big Ideal project, and she was great. It was kind of stressful for her, but she was cool, she's really nice. [8139]
Reference Tags
[8324] Ikea effect,[8331] Listening disposition,[8339] Organizational encouragement,[8341] Organizing effectively,[8355] Empathetic disposition,[8357] Internal changes/challenges,[8325] Ikea effect,[8356] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[8326] Ikea effect,[8358] Anecdotal fallacy,[8317] Insufficient Feedback,[8332] Micromanaging,[8351] Vague roles,[8307] Communication issues,[8333] Micromanaging,[8352] Vague roles,[8327] Inexperience,[8353] Vague roles,[8359] Communication issues,[8308] Communication issues,[8334] Micromanaging,[8354] Vague roles,[8328] Lack of real innovation mandate,[8345] Risk compensation,[8360] Conservatism,[8304] Communicating ideas across domains,[8346] Risk compensation,[8305] Communicating ideas across domains,[8321] Compromising conflict about ideas,[8347] Risk compensation,[8361] Vague goals,[8362] Communication issues,[8309] Communication issues,[8350] Vague goals,[8363] Vague goals,[8329] Win-win conflict about ideas,[8365] Alignment,[8364] Communication issues,[8348] Scope creep,[8330] Win-win conflict about ideas,[8306] Communicating ideas across domains,[8340] Organizational encouragement,[8342] Organizing effectively,[8349] Trust,[8310] Communication issues,[8316] Cultural differences,[8322] Forceful conflict about ideas,[8335] Micromanaging,[8367] Communication issues,[8366] Forceful conflict about relationships,[8368] Woman blaming man,[8311] Communication issues,[8323] Forceful conflict about ideas,[8336] Micromanaging,[8369] Forceful conflict about relationships,[8370] Lack of trust,[8371] Unresolved relationship conflict,[8372] Language barrier,[8312] Communication issues,[8337] Micromanaging,[8100] Alignment,[8313] Communication issues,[8338] Micromanaging,[8129] Lack of resources,[8314] Communication issues,[8344] Resilience,[8315] Communication issues,[8125] Illusory superiority,[8101] Communication issues,[8118] Group attribution error,[8373] Insufficient Feedback,[8318] Insufficient Feedback,[8374] Alignment,[8143] Alignment,[8144] Cultural differences,[8140] Trust,[8375] Insufficient Feedback,[8319] Insufficient Feedback,[8102] Communication issues,[8126] Indecisive leadership,[8113] Insufficient Feedback,[8141] Vague goals,[8343] Organizing effectively,[8114] Insufficient Feedback,[8376] Organizing effectively,[8377] Trust,[8320] Great example - Team Dynamics,[8103] Communication issues,[8127] Indecisive leadership,[8142] Vague roles,[8112] Decisive leadership,[8119] Group attribution error,[8135] Risk compensation,[8120] Group attribution error,[8145] Status quo bias,[8136] Scope creep,[8137] Scope creep,[8148] Communication issues,[8147] Cultural differences,[8146] Internal changes/challenges,[8104] Communication issues,[8107] Cultural differences,[8115] Insufficient Feedback,[8149] Cultural differences,[8150] Insufficient Feedback,[8116] Insufficient Feedback,[8108] Cultural differences,[8121] Group attribution error,[8109] Cultural differences,[8122] Group attribution error,[8151] Anchoring,[8152] Cultural differences,[8105] Communication issues,[8110] Cultural differences,[8123] Group attribution error,[8106] Communication issues,[8111] Cultural differences,[8153] Cultural differences,[8138] Trust,[8154] Trust,[8117] Great example - Team Dynamics,[8130] Quick resolution of relationship conflict,[8124] Forceful conflict about ideas,[8128] Win-win conflict about ideas,[8155] Communication issues,[8156] Lack of trust,[8131] Quick resolution of relationship conflict,[8132] Quick resolution of relationship conflict,[8133] Quick resolution of relationship conflict,[8157] Forceful conflict about relationships,[8134] Quick resolution of relationship conflict,[8139] Trust

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MADISON BARNETT
I get my inspiration from the fictional world. I’m a social geek. Completely exploit 24/365 catalysts for change whereas high standards in action items. Conveniently whiteboard multifunctional benefits without enabled leadership.
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