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PNC Bank

P

Interviewee

43 Practice Person

Team Disadvantages

Project Outcome

Control

Industry

Financial

Location

Chicago

Team Risk Tolerance

High

Team Dynamics

TeamDynamics_Turnaround

Company

PNC Bank


This was a big, high risk thing. They were really taking the plunge. The chief operating officer was quite suspicious of us, she was not the person who hired us. But by the end she became our fan. But the person who was responsible for the advisor central portal, at the beginning pretty quickly we went into the field and started learning some stuff that she realized was pretty significant, she was heavily involved and she became a very good advocate for the team. So everything went really, really well with the client [inaudible 00:55:01] on our end, I was pretty involved. [3060]
This was a big, high risk thing. They were really taking the plunge. The chief operating officer was quite suspicious of us, she was not the person who hired us. But by the end she became our fan. But the person who was responsible for the advisor central portal, at the beginning pretty quickly we went into the field and started learning some stuff that she realized was pretty significant, she was heavily involved and she became a very good advocate for the team. So everything went really, really well with the client [inaudible 00:55:01] on our end, I was pretty involved. The first half of the project, our [inaudible 00:55:07] team did struggle. [3061]
So, things got done but it could've been maybe a little better if the team had really gelled more and had the right fit, the personalities. Midway through the project the team slightly reassembled and became a perfect team. One team member left and two more team members came on and we ended up in the perfect team for the last half of the project. [3063]
Because we didn't have the perfect mix, we sort of borrowed some business factors from Boston that came in a little bit, we needed more business on it. We had a designer who was maybe a little bit too junior and wasn't quite enough of a strategic thinker in the program that got frustrated with how ambiguous the content was. So when it came to doing early concept prototyping, couldn't quite get her head around what to prototype So, but the project leader had to really overly direct what those early prototypes looked like and ideally you really want it to be a conversation between the entire team [3062]
Midway through the project the team slightly reassembled and became a perfect team. One team member left and two more team members came on and we ended up in the perfect team for the last half of the project. [3072]
Yeah. So we made an adjustment, we knew it wasn't working, so we made an adjustment. It's one of those things where we knew it wasn't the perfect team at the beginning but to start the project we started without the perfect team. Sometimes you think, "Oh, it'll work, it'll be fine," knew it wasn't perfect. In fact, the designer who came on to replace her was the person that was slated to do the project but then another project came and he got pulled into that and basically we had a period where we had some compromised teams that didn't have the perfect mix and skill mix. So it's just the way it goes. But we corrected and ... [3064]
Yeah, I think that there was one person who was leading the program that was the day to day sort of counsel, very close relationship. So, she was not only a decision maker but an advisor. And then there were probably a couple other decision makers that worked with her but she was really took on this role of socializing things as they came up, this is a very, very iterative, organic program that as we migrated from fixing Advisor Central into sort of exploring a new business, that was part of a major shift. So, I think that she took it on herself to sort of ... We'd formally talk about some of those things in addition to our presentations. So, then there were a couple other decision makers because they ultimately had to ... [3065]
And then at the end there were a couple of like key milestones, there were two key milestones, one in the middle of the program where we actually had a go no go written into the contract. We can stop work now because we knew that it was a risky proposition to fix somebody that was in such terrible trouble, so we said, we were up front and said, "You know what? We believe we can come up with a point of view and an opportunity for you after eight weeks, but if we don't, we can stop the program." So that's when the chief operating officer came in as decision maker even though she hadn't been involved because she had to approve funding for the rest of the program. So, there was the core team and then there was the chief operating officer that was really another decision maker. And so at that key milestone there was a couple days while they internally discussed till they gave us the green light for the rest of the program. So she has to be included. But, yeah. [3066]
ell, I think that in the ... I mean, pretty early on, like a couple weeks, the first time we went into the field and even talking to them, we attended an internal meeting that they had between two other divisions, sort of talking about how they could work more closely together and we sort of hung back and just observed. There was lots of like,, "I talked to somebody so and so last week and I heard that so and so is doing this." And we'd go an talk to somebody from an advisor or fund company and it was also, "Well, I sort of heard this from somebody or we talked to a wholesaler." [3073]
At the end of the program, not at the end but sort of in the last month, we spent more time looking into the organizations but some days talking to people about how this might be implemented, what kind of capabilities they have, and so we came up with some pretty harsh findings about maybe not being able to implement this so well and she said, "Look, bring it on. Let's share this with everybody else. I'd rather you ... Let's just not hide anything, be absolutely straightforward with everybody." [3075],[3074]
Excellent. That was wonderful, particularly with the project lead, she was just ... At the end she just said, "I'm going to miss our calls, I can't believe I'm not going to be seeing you next week." It was a very, very personal relationship, it was really good. Again, absolute honesty, just like contrasting to the client that had hidden agendas, it was unclear, this client was absolutely straightforward with both their successes and failures. I mean, the first week of the program they lost a couple of their key clients, she forwarded the press releases and just said, "Look, I just have to tell you what's going on." There was no shame, sort of like we just want to let you know what's going on and that makes for a wonderful relationship. At the end of the program, not at the end but sort of in the last month, we spent more time looking into the organizations but some days talking to people about how this might be implemented, what kind of capabilities they have, and so we came up with some pretty harsh findings about maybe not being able to implement this so well and she said, "Look, bring it on. Let's share this with everybody else. I'd rather you ... Let's just not hide anything, be absolutely straightforward with everybody." [3069],[3068],[3067]
So because she said, "We can't hide, we have to fix the problems." [3076],[3077]
So because she said, "We can't hide, we have to fix the problems." So basically a very, very ... To do something different, you're going to have to change, they can't go on as operations as they are today, we might have to radically rethink how our organization works, she's totally like recognizes that's what it's going to take. [3070]
First half didn't work so well because we had sort of the wrong skills to try to mix. And sometimes if you have the wrong people or particularly a strategic project, they struggle because it's just not the right skills so that creates sometimes some people who feel like they're disengaged or could create some tensions. [3078]
For the second half, excellent. They worked like clockwork. Beautiful relationships in the second half, it was the right mix of people, the right skillset, the right mix of people. [3079]
They worked like clockwork. Beautiful relationships in the second half, it was the right mix of people, the right skillset, the right mix of people. First half didn't work so well because we had sort of the wrong skills to try to mix [3071]
Reference Tags
[3060] Great example - Productive innovation norms,[3061] Believes one has a hopeful path,[3063] Organizing effectively,[3062] Indecisive leadership,[3072] Ikea effect,[3064] Organizing effectively,[3065] Communicating ideas across domains,[3066] Internal changes/challenges,[3073] Empathetic disposition,[3075] Communicating ideas across domains,[3074] Organizational encouragement,[3069] Communicating ideas across domains,[3068] Decisive leadership,[3067] Great example - Productive innovation norms,[3076] Believes one has a hopeful path,[3077] Optimism,[3070] Risk compensation,[3078] Lack of resources,[3079] Organizing effectively,[3071] Resilience

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