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Pharmaceutical (large company)

P

Interviewee

144 Researcher

Team Disadvantages

3, 4

Project Outcome

Successful

Industry

Medical

Location

Shanghai

Team Risk Tolerance

High

Team Dynamics

TeamDynamics_FunandProductive

Company

Pharmaceutical (large company)


I think it was also a medium one. It was definitely not one of the huge, big projects. It was also in terms of the positioning of the project was more a strategic one for IDEO as well because it was actually the first project we did looking at the same schools. It was about an area that I hope to grow into more. [6875]
On the client side we had one key contact. He handed it, basically, over because he got promoted in the middle of it to another guy. There were two but their core team consisted of four people. [6876]
It's a health practice and it's so restricted so I think it was high. With everything we suggested it was like, "No you can do this. No you can't do that.", which wasn't so much the client, but more the industry we are working in. I would say between mid and high. [6877]
No, because it was positioned so strategically actually on the health practice have given us permission to not work on the margins, to actually sort of just do what we had to do. For example, I was supposed to be pulled off that project after the human factors phase was over, but, I mean, I said I really wanted to learn. I really wanted to have a chance to finally be on a project a bit longer. Once I talked with them it was like, you know what, actually it does make sense to expose you more to this because hopefully we're going to get more projects like this. In the end the health practice said well, don't worry about margins and that was quite special. That also made life so much easier. [6879],[6878],[6889],[6887],[6888]
I think, first of all, it was a lot about understanding. We went out and did ride alongs with [inaudible 00:06:17] reps. We went to, all three of us which is quite rare, went to different locations on our own. Usually people don't go out on their own for HF. Usually always two people. That was really exhausting but at the same time allowed us to get some insights, I think, that were more intimate in a way because it was just a one on one conversation. Like with you now and not with a team of three where you're a bit like, okay, should I say this or not? [6890]
At the end of the day, I think the inspiration came from sitting down and really allowing us the time and the space to talk through things. We also had collaborative workshops where we asked sales people from the client company to actually come and join us and do a prototyping workshop. Those were helpful because it showed us, again, how difficult it was to design anything in that space. [6880]
A lot of the inspiration, I think, was actually coming from being with really cool people and sitting down, talking, and then having some time to yourself going through things. Then looking at things again and going like, oh you know what, that really reminds me of this and this. Check out this web page and sending each other YouTube clips, web pages, interesting stuff. [6891]
The guy who was our key contact, he was even too busy to pick up the phone. We had a really hard time getting in touch with him. Then it felt like the more contact we actually did have, the more times he came over and we presented stuff, as the Danish are very straightforward, very honest, blatantly honest, also very clear about what he wanted- [6881]
I think there were ... it was like a typical guy's dynamics. I was the only girl on the team. Two guys and then Scot, the graphic designer, joined us so it was four of us. Then our ID person joined, this other guy. The coaches were ... No, there's, our BD, she's female but it was a really, sort of, buddy relationship with the team. There was a lot of joking. [6882]
There was a lot of sharing but then there were also really intense moments where, I mean, we were all out in the field. We're connecting on Skype. We meant to do a download but then we just said, you know what, I'm actually just so exhausted about things. Thanks to Hunts being so gay about it, although he's just not. I think that just made the relationship very rich. It wasn't a superficial project [6892]
There was a lot of sharing but then there were also really intense moments where, I mean, we were all out in the field. We're connecting on Skype. We meant to do a download but then we just said, you know what, I'm actually just so exhausted about things. Thanks to Hunts being so gay about it, although he's just not. I think that just made the relationship very rich. It wasn't a superficial project. [6884],[6883]
Also, I think, because all of a sudden we realized how many people have diabetes. How many lives have been touched with diabetes. How all of a sudden we hear stories about how, especially older doctors, never change their treatment since they went to med school 20 years or 30 years ago. You suddenly realize that it is an epidemic that is spreading especially in the U.S. [6885]
I think that was something where it was also quite hard for us to go through emotionally and see all this and have doctors that tell us, "Yeah, and I tell my patients to workout and to do more exercise." Then you see all their staff members that are barrels. You just think they will be your next patient. [6886]
Yeah, I think the last one [inaudible 00:16:09] is, I think what was really good about this project was that it was ... it ran out of the health practice, but none of us actually, as a team members, had been exposed to any health practice projects before, so I think that was a really good thing because we had three coaches, and in the [inaudible 00:16:30] three coaches, I was like, "Oh guys, yeah right. What is this gonna be like?" But what it turned out to be was that two people, because it was health practice, but then partly transformation. Are you familiar with transformation? [6840]
It's basically looking at companies and seeing how they ... it's a bit like change management, but also helping them implement this. For example, now with this project, we actually had ... I think we went okay to 70% in the health practice and 30% in transformations. We had one coach from health, and one from transformation, plus then the BD person to scope the project. [6841]
What was really helpful was that, especially, the guy from the health practice, he was so aware that none of us had a health background, so he would tell the project manager, don't worry about my billing wage, I do the regular check ins for as the coaching, which basically would be like an hour a week or something, or sometimes two hours a week. But then he would say, "You know what? If you have any question about health, I'm happy to stay on longer." I mean, if we had some sessions where we would stay for four hours and we would just pick his brain and go, "Okay, tell us about it. How does it work? What is the [inaudible 00:17:43]? What is the history of insulin? What are the different insulin pens?" Just like questions like this, 'cause none of us had a clue about that. And so, that was really helpful. [6861],[6860],[6859],[6842],[6843],[6858]
Alex, who was the third guy, he actually said at some point, "[inaudible 00:18:31] is so gay." Because he's so reflective, and I mean, he's from Spain, so he's like machismo. He was like, "This is so gay." But that really helped because Hans was telling us, "You know what, guys? I'm not feeling good about this, and I'm getting really nervous." [6846]
I think another thing was that our project manager was very transparent. Hands on, on the one way, kept away everything that was ... that could've distracted the team. She was really building this transparent wall between us and the client, and at the same time, it was transparent, so we actually knew what was going on. I think what was also really adding to this was he was very much reflecting on his own thoughts, and his own feelings towards the project. [6845],[6844]
I think another thing was that our project manager was very transparent. Hands on, on the one way, kept away everything that was ... that could've distracted the team. She was really building this transparent wall between us and the client, and at the same time, it was transparent, so we actually knew what was going on. I think what was also really adding to this was he was very much reflecting on his own thoughts, and his own feelings towards the project. Alex, who was the third guy, he actually said at some point, "[inaudible 00:18:31] is so gay." Because he's so reflective, and I mean, he's from Spain, so he's like machismo. He was like, "This is so gay." But that really helped because Hans was telling us, "You know what, guys? I'm not feeling good about this, and I'm getting really nervous." [6862]
Obviously, we were a very mature team, if you tell not that mature people, like very junior people that you are very nervous, I mean, it's sort of like the nervousness spills and it doesn't do any good. But with our team, it was like, we just knew we could pull it off. [6863],[6864]
Obviously, we were a very mature team, if you tell not that mature people, like very junior people that you are very nervous, I mean, it's sort of like the nervousness spills and it doesn't do any good. But with our team, it was like, we just knew we could pull it off. In that sense, then sharing these feelings was actually really helpful 'cause then some of us could say, "Hans, not at all. We as a team have a really good feeling." He'd go like, "Really?" And then we would talk about it, so we had multilayered conversations about the actual work, about logistics, about stuff that was going on. About how we analyze the client, which is always helpful. Like what is the client's position? Who's our point of contact? Really getting a good idea of how they are internally situated, like their politics [6850]
Obviously, we were a very mature team, if you tell not that mature people, like very junior people that you are very nervous, I mean, it's sort of like the nervousness spills and it doesn't do any good. But with our team, it was like, we just knew we could pull it off. In that sense, then sharing these feelings was actually really helpful 'cause then some of us could say, "Hans, not at all. We as a team have a really good feeling." He'd go like, "Really?" And then we would talk about it, so we had multilayered conversations about the actual work, about logistics, about stuff that was going on. About how we analyze the client, which is always helpful. Like what is the client's position? Who's our point of contact? Really getting a good idea of how they are internally situated, like their politics. [6849],[6851],[6847],[6848]
What is at risk for him if we don't give him the bag, you know? To sort of understand what's going on on their side, and then the third layer, to say, okay how are we all feeling about this? Obviously, the client didn't take part in that bit, but it really was about the team. Yeah, so we finished the project and yeah, now they're thinking about implementing in, and internally they shared it with their top guy. And so, it's really ... Yeah, I think it was a very successful project. [6865],[6854],[6852],[6853]
There are even numbers that, for sales reps, for one week, they don't call in the doctor, the rate drops off prescriptions. There really is part to it, however, we're now in a world where they can't give any presents anymore. They can't take doctors golfing, or [inaudible 00:21:24]. I don't know what. Now it's all reduced to samples, like drug samples, and pens, sticky, like sticky post its. It's becoming a bit ridiculous because the sales reps, they walk into the door, they first have their schmoozing chat with the ... with Sue who sits at the reception and hands the first token to buy access to the room in the back, and the treatment rooms. [6866]
Sometimes they get to see the doctors, and usually doctors were like, "You know what? Good sales reps are people who actually offer a service. But the ones that just shout at me like, 'Aspirin, doctor. Buy aspirin. Prescribe aspirin.', they're just not any use." The idea was, okay ... And the reps also do lunches. What's happening now is that lunches get banned, sales reps get banned and the next thing will be samples will be banned, and what are you gonna do then? Novo Nordisk is a Danish company for insulin, an insulin bio farm manufacturer, and they were like, "You know what? We entered the US market, we just hired another 700 salespeople, so we don't want to get rid of them right away, so let's see what we can do." We went out to understand what is the sales interaction like, and so, what are the opportunity spaces? [6867]
What are the areas that you can actually, within this highly restricted pharma code, and highly restricted, or this highly volatile situation, how can you actually find out new ways of bringing value? We came up with a couple of ideas in terms of actually supporting the doctors, realized some doctors just had really huge egos, and they really needed sales reps to help them. I mean, there are some weird dynamics going on, especially with older doctors, and also with very young doctors that are taught in med school stay away from the sales reps. They all want to influence you. You have very many different audiences. Yeah, so we came up with a couple of concepts that were actually quite far out. [6870],[6869],[6868]
They really were concepts in the sense of, "Okay, tomorrow your lunches are banned. The day after tomorrow your samples are banned, but hang on, we got some stuff for you here." However, the client was like, "Yeah, I really like that stuff, but my boss, she's not gonna like that." They were like, "You know, we need a bag." That was then the whole discussion with the bag versus scenarios about creating value added services for a sales rep. For example, one idea we had was the sales rep finding out information about diabetes, prediabetes, like where can you buy fresh groceries for a cheap price? Where's a gym that has the best membership and whatever? Free membership with a free pair of trainers, or I don't know what. [6855]
But to then have the sales rep being like the agent to go out, collect all this information and create a webpage for the doctors. That was one of the ideas. I mean, client loved it. Said like, "Yeah, but my boss, she wants a bag." We were like, "Okay." In the end, I mean, that was like ... I think the success of the project was that we all talked about it. It wasn't just decided by the PM going, "Okay, we need a designer, you design a bag." [6856]
But it was more like, "Okay guys, what do you feel? What is the bag standing for? What is it resembling?" At some point, I mean, we could've all killed him because of the bag, because we're all like, "Yes, we need the bag." [inaudible 00:24:46] anymore. But looking back, I think it was just really good 'cause it felt like we were, despite of having different years at IDO, despite of being ... just having different experiences and life experiences, but it really felt like we were all sitting at a table and we were all valued with our opinion. I think that was, for example, for me, what really make this also a successful project. [6871],[6872],[6874],[6873],[6857]
Reference Tags
[6875] Organizational encouragement,[6876] Internal changes/challenges,[6877] Risk compensation,[6879] Communicating ideas across domains,[6878] Great example - Individual & Team outcomes for future efforts,[6889] Organizational encouragement,[6887] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[6888] Win-win conflict about relationships,[6890] Empathetic disposition,[6880] Communicating ideas across domains,[6891] Empathetic disposition,[6881] Communication issues,[6882] Implicit stereotypes,[6892] Trust,[6884] Trust,[6883] Unbalanced workload pressure,[6885] Identifiable victim effect,[6886] Identifiable victim effect,[6840] Communicating ideas across domains,[6841] Communicating ideas across domains,[6861] Appropriate resources,[6860] Collaborative-Creative Disposition,[6859] Communicating ideas across domains,[6842] Communicating ideas across domains,[6843] Organizational encouragement,[6858] Win-win conflict about relationships,[6846] Empathetic disposition,[6845] Communicating ideas across domains,[6844] Decisive leadership,[6862] Communication issues,[6863] Believes one has a hopeful path,[6864] Believes one has high agency,[6850] Great example - Productive innovation norms,[6849] Believes one has a hopeful path,[6851] Organizational encouragement,[6847] Win-win conflict about ideas,[6848] Win-win conflict about relationships,[6865] Believes one has high agency,[6854] Decisive leadership,[6852] Empathetic disposition,[6853] Win-win conflict about relationships,[6866] Empathetic disposition,[6867] Empathetic disposition,[6870] Believes one has high agency,[6869] Creative Confidence,[6868] Empathetic disposition,[6855] Win-win conflict about ideas,[6856] Win-win conflict about ideas,[6871] Appropriate resources,[6872] Communicating ideas across domains,[6874] Empathetic disposition,[6873] Trust,[6857] Win-win conflict about ideas

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