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Olympus

O

Interviewee

103 Generic Creative

Team Advantages

Team Disadvantages

0, 2

Project Outcome

Successful

Industry

Home electronics/cameras/TV/copiers

Location

Sydney

Team Risk Tolerance

Low

Team Dynamics

TeamDynamics_FunandProductive

Company

Olympus


So, it was a month, I believe in the planning. Jane and Andy were very adamant that we could sell this idea to the point that were literally saying that this is a great ad, it could be great. So it's great to have that kind of leadership from the beginning. The client very slowly came around, with a lot of reservations, but when we got the director on board, Paul Mandich, which is probably one of the best directors around, that then kind of gave us a bit more kind of look we know what we are talking about. At the end of the day the ad was pretty good, and all the things that came out, and the response so far has been pretty great. [5200],[5190]
And while the client had lots of restrictions, we had to use the doggy lips. We knew that from the beginning and basically worked with that and it went pretty smoothly. [5066]
We had a lot of media to cover with it which was, kind of, one of the problems to start with but worked out really well. We had to still do that [inaudible 00:01:33], the really big ones. So then, everything had a separate style as well so we had to shoot to that. That was something to around, but the client was just awesome all the way through it. Made such a huge difference. [5072],[5069]
It was pretty low actually. 'Cause I mean they said they wanted their dog in there. So it's kind of like - came out with some pretty cool campaigns for a tough camera which is an awesome proposition, but then I said we had to have the dog in there because they became attached to the dog last year or something and it had to be used all the way through. So that kind of like brought it down a bit, the use of light because there's only so much that a dog can do. That kind of narrowed it. [5060],[5062]
So that kind of like brought it down a bit, the use of light because there's only so much that a dog can do. That kind of narrowed it. [5073]
So we kind of, pushed the grade on it and tried to make it look as cool as possible. Because it could've so easily just been like a flat image of - you know. Boring dog and that kind of thing, but we managed to work out okay. [5067],[5063]
We did like - we pushed the dog as far as it could. So we made the dog have personality and it was kind of like, cool 'cause it messed up this whole room but the camera was fine. So that was our concept. And you have fun with that. And so we had like, a picture of it with the camera in it's mouth and like, shaking it all around so it really became like an art original thing other than anything else. [5068],[5064]
It was hideous. I've not yet seen them react that way, or not heard of them react that way since or before. We literally were saying, get rid of the dog, and their whole products. It's almost as if I was to say to you, lose the energizer bunny, and that's how they saw it. They said, you can't. The brand is the dog. I said no it's not, your product is what it's all about. So yeah, there was a lot of adversity, a lot. To the point where they were going, nah, nah. [5192],[5191],[5193]
It's almost as if I was to say to you, lose the energizer bunny, and that's how they saw it. They said, you can't. The brand is the dog. I said no it's not, your product is what it's all about. So yeah, there was a lot of adversity, a lot. To the point where they were going, nah, nah. [5201],[5202]
Pretty good actually. I mean, I suppose it was from - we had the benefit of the marketing manager's brother worked with us as well. It was kind of that sort of, prior relationship. But I can't say that that added to everything though. It's just nice people. And they seemed to trust us and listen to what we're saying and that was sort of switched on as well. They weren't afraid to, sort of go "Oh God no. We have to do it like this?" They were ready to hear what you had to say. So that's cool. [5070],[5061],[5065]
They weren't afraid to, sort of go "Oh God no. We have to do it like this?" They were ready to hear what you had to say. So that's cool. [5074],[5075]
The briefing when we got it you mean? We got it a week before it was due. Everyone else had a crack at it and we were put on it at the last minute, and they said look see if you guys can do something. So yeah a week is a lot to do, for a brand like this, both Jane and Andy wanted something really good. [5194]
I don't know for this specific project, it got tense at one point. But that was pretty much it. And I think that was more between like production and service not communicating and about getting it out on time and that kind of thing. So it wasn't really the creative. [5071]
Mark's twin brother was the client [5199]
The relationship was pretty good, we knew we had at least one of the decision makers not being in favor of this but willing to hear us out as opposed to going nah nah nah nah nah. But one of the key decision makers from Olympus was very adamant that they couldn't lose the dog entirely, so we just at least have him in the van in part of the script, so he does link a little performance, and it's quite nice, but he is definitely not the, the focus of the ad. [5203],[5195],[5198]
Creative team or... Ah, You know, having a week to crack a big brief is not a lot but once we came to them with the idea, we literally said, it's so tough it's like nothing ever happened, they got it. Mark and myself have a great relationship, and we have a great relationship with Jane and Andy, but once we got to the point, they said yeah great, let's write it up, and we had a script and that got to it so, we've never, I've never had a problem with that point of the process at all, no, it's good. [5196]
With Olympus we're likely because we have probably got one of the better account guys on it Pete Boz. Once he saw the idea, he was yeah we will sell it, and he was on board all the way. So from, I suppose, from the get go, he was there saying, okay, if we are going to sell this thing we are going to have to show them, just wear them down. Whatever they come up with we have to have the finances for. So having the support was key. Simple things like explaining to them that you don't need to thinks still in the eighties or nineties and having and mnemonic device to sell a product. You know, like apple just go, look it's cool and people buy shit loads of it it you know. And what we're saying is, ours is tough, you can break it and it won't break, you know, it's unbreakable. And they go okay. So we came in with a strategist laid out. [5197]
Reference Tags
[5200] Organizational encouragement,[5190] Risk compensation,[5066] Believes one has a hopeful path,[5072] Balance of challenging work,[5069] Great example - Productive innovation norms,[5060] Anchoring,[5062] Forceful conflict about ideas,[5073] Finding Existing Ideas,[5067] Believes one has a hopeful path,[5063] Compromising conflict about ideas,[5068] Believes one has a hopeful path,[5064] Compromising conflict about ideas,[5192] Anchoring,[5191] Premature idea evaluation,[5193] Risk compensation,[5201] Alignment,[5202] Status quo bias,[5070] Great example - External Influences,[5061] Trust,[5065] Win-win conflict about ideas,[5074] Collaborative-Creative Disposition,[5075] Trust,[5194] Planning fallacy,[5071] Indecisive leadership,[5199] Great example - External Influences,[5203] Status quo bias,[5195] Anchoring,[5198] Win-win conflict about ideas,[5196] Organizing effectively,[5197] Organizing effectively

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