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Nike

N

Interviewee

54 Creative

Team Disadvantages

2, 4

Project Outcome

Successful

Industry

Sport

Location

Buenos Aires

Team Risk Tolerance

High

Team Dynamics

TeamDynamics_FunandProductive

Company

Nike


No, it's one we did here but it won awards in all the festivals. [4000]
So that phrase ' In soccer, Argentina and Brazil are rivals. So the problem we had here was having that global concept, 'Joga Bonito' in this country. So we told the client, what if we take another concept for Argentina that is not 'Joga Bonito?' And Nike said, 'No, work with 'Joga Bonito.'' [4008]
So that phrase ' In soccer, Argentina and Brazil are rivals. So the problem we had here was having that global concept, 'Joga Bonito' in this country. So we told the client, what if we take another concept for Argentina that is not 'Joga Bonito?' And Nike said, 'No, work with 'Joga Bonito.'' So that was a big problem. It was not good for the brand because you are taking it right to your rival, you see? So what we did was ' we came together, the creative team and the agency, my previous agency, which is BBDO. [4002],[3995]
Okay, so we went there and we took ten blocks. We did some installations, photo exhibitions, art advertising for ten blocks. It was like an experience for the consumer with the brand and on one side ' two of the most popular teams here were born in Boca, so it takes you to soccer and the tradition, change and it's full of local reminiscences. So we took that neighborhood and we made it like a 'Barrio Bonito' a soccer neighborhood. And if you tell me, well did 30 million people go see it? No. The good thing about this was that the press took it and magnified the action where only 5 or 10 thousand people went. But through the press it make it to every paper and newscast, CNN, you know? Everybody was talking about it on the radio and so the message made it to the people. It was a success not just ' well, the action was great and at the festival level it won everywhere. It won a Grand Prix in Clio, where the agency had never won before. It won the Grand Prix in San Sebastian. It won everywhere except for the BMBA [ph] [3997]
It's not easy to intervene a neighborhood. You have to get all the permits, the new contract and it's not like a traditional media for advertising, where everything is already established and, like on TV, it's there. You put it on TV and it's out there. This was a lot more work, let's say. It wasn't traditional media. It was practically to come up with new media. [3994]
In this one? 100% We were at risk all the time because it was a process that no one knew about and that was different, so we needed the client to take a risk and say, 'Well, this can be done but it's not going to go through the tradition approval channels and experimentation.' [3993],[4005]
The brief didn't say anything about a neighborhood. The brief was what I told you before. It was a problem. The problem was that the concept took you back to Brazilian soccer and we are in Argentina, its rival. So that was the problem. We had a problem. We had the brief and in reality we had to take down the 'Joga bonito' campaign. It was going to be a failure. People were going to throw eggs at the billboards, which had already happened. People don't like billboard with Brazilian soccer players. So to solve that problem we decided to hand our brief ' [4003],[3996]
What happens that it was about soccer and I was born playing soccer? I watch soccer and it runs through my veins, you know? Being born here and having soccer be the national sport inspired me. Let's say it's like when we work with soccer, it's something that I am very familiar with. You have it within you. You have it on your skin. I still play soccer and I play with a soccer team and do championships. [3992]
With the client? We as creative didn't have a lot of friction. On the production side there were a bit more because the client was nervous. We had to launch it before the World Cup, so there was a deadline and on that part ' and with having to get approved ' it was sort of tense. We weren't' on that part and we started thinking on the next, on how to implement them. [4001],[4006],[4007]
Yes, it did. We made it. Nervous, but we made it. [4004]
Yes, the account people. No, great, they were very involved because they were the link between us, the client, the production, so they were very involved in the project. Very involved. [3998]
Yes, because in his kind of thing ' it's a lot easier to produce a commercial than this neighborhood, that's why a sort of task force was need because everybody needed to be working; it wasn't just creativity. It was also about how you implemented it and produced it. [3999]
Reference Tags
[4000] Peak-end rule,[4008] Forceful conflict about ideas,[4002] Believes one has a hopeful path,[3995] Compromising conflict about ideas,[3997] Ikea effect,[3994] Effort justification,[3993] Communicating ideas across domains,[4005] Trust,[4003] Believes one has a hopeful path,[3996] Compromising conflict about ideas,[3992] Anecdotal fallacy,[4001] Risk compensation,[4006] Trust,[4007] Unbalanced workload pressure,[4004] Believes one has a hopeful path,[3998] Organizing effectively,[3999] Organizing effectively

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