Skip to content

Nestlé

N

Interviewee

160 Creative

Team Advantages

Team Disadvantages

0, 3

Project Outcome

Successful

Industry

Confectionery/sweets/gum

Location

Johannesburg

Team Risk Tolerance

Low

Team Dynamics

TeamDynamics_Turnaround

Company

Nestlé


Well there's the Kit Kat one which I explained earlier. That's the kind of latest one we did. It's important in an agency to have a creative director who's on the same page as you. JWT is a funny place because before I arrived, I hadn't won any awards but then as I arrived, fortunately we had a guy called Ron McKinnon join us and Ron McKinnon, he's like the don on advertisers in Africa. He pushed proactive. So a lot of ideas, you know as soon as you get a big guy behind you, who's also a judge, then things start going well because then you're on the same page. He wants to do creative and you want to do creative and so I've had a lot of proactive ideas for awards that have gone really well lately. In fact, the first idea I had when I got a chance is three years ago, was an idea to link the Apple shortcut keys, so Apple save. So you show a picture of cat up a tree and it just says Apple save, and it says "If only life was Macintosh." [7506],[7525]
That's the one idea I had and then I worked with my creative director and then we had all this Apple quit, Apple escape, Apple this, Apple that. Next thing you know, this thing is entered and won and was amazing. From that, we've had a couple of ideas that have been working like that. When we have the agency involved, the creative director involved, and you've got production involved to help us work up budgets and get voice artists, and you've got my art director Chris who you'll meet, he's superb. He's very, very good. So things work well when everyone's on board. Even if, for proactive, it's a lot easier because clients don't come into it as much as they do with normal briefs. It's nice to do really nice ads and briefs and win awards, but it happens a lot less than when you have the carte blanche to do with proactive, when you're just allowed to take up and go. [7527],[7526]
The process was quite hard. It started off, at the very open the whole agency had it and Kit Kat, they know what they don't like and they don't really know what they like. So we were just kind of flapping around not knowing where to go really. [7529]
Then another team [inaudible 00:14:06] came up with an idea of a little, "Woohoo" device as a reminder to have a break, so a little Kit Kat chocolate figure will go, "Woohoo," have a break. Chris and I and the creative director Dave, weren't that keen on it but we presented it anyway as luck would have it, the client loves this thing and they want it to be the new Coke "Brrr," you know the "Brrr" campaign. [7516]
They want it to be as big as that. We were a bit doubtful. Anyway, we pushed and pushed and pushed. Eventually we managed to build an idea around the the "Woohoo" of a person in a queue who hears a "Woohoo," takes a bit of a Kit Kat and then something cool and amazing and fantastic happens around it. [7517]
Sure thing. But yeah, all they wanted was like literally a chocolate finger with a little chocolate mouth going "Woohoo" and that scared us, the image and the idea. So we managed to push back and at the end of the day we kind of held their hand and led them through the process and explained to them if they want to make this a [inaudible 00:15:21], what makes it [inaudible 00:15:21] is that the advertising, they think they're cool. They think they know what's cool. They've done all their research and they know what ticks, but the reality is far different. What happens is they think they know that this will work but it's not. It really isn't so we had to kind of lead them through it. Together, we got to a place where we had a garage and people were break dancing. We had a conference call and the glass started singing Marvin Gaye. We phoned one of Gaye's producers and we got the rights to the song. All incredibly exciting, especially for us at the tip of Africa to be talking to Marvin Gaye's producers and that kind of thing and getting the rights for this. Terribly exciting. [7511],[7507],[7518]
Then, we got a good director and we got good music and we actually managed ... and the whole time ... do you want to get it? [7519]
That's okay. But the whole time we're pushing client, we're also kind of cutting away at this "woohoo" thing. Eventually, it became ... and they hear the song, the " Woohoo" but they don't even know if it's in the bag or in their heads, it's just a little pneumonic, a little reminder and at the end of the ad it's just have a break, "Woohoo," have a Kit Kat. That's all it became. That's believable because that kind of works into the story. Why else would he look in his bag and get reminded of the Kit Kat? It certainly does break away from animated chocolate. [7520]
So we were very happy at the outcome and I think it did well for Kit Kat and it did well for us. That's what you do in advertising. That's what you have to do because we work for clients, but at the same sense, clients don't pay [inaudible 00:17:06], JWT because I'm working with JWT, and advertising is a funny thing. You're trying to build up your portfolio. You don't want to- [7521]
It's hard not to be selfish in advertising, but you want to make nice ads for an agency and a client and yourself. I think with Kit Kat we did. I've got a nice ... I might go work in London next year and having a nice Kit kat, that's an international brand, is something really nice. Everyone walked away from it very happy. Me, the agency and client. [7522]
. A lot of JWT's, we align globally with a lot of clients which causes a lot of problems because they have to report back to some boss in America, so they're not willing to take chances and everything has to go into research and stuff like that so they're very defensive. [7532]
They don't want to be creative. They don't want to take chances [7533]
They're not tolerant at all. A lot of JWT's, we align globally with a lot of clients which causes a lot of problems because they have to report back to some boss in America, so they're not willing to take chances and everything has to go into research and stuff like that so they're very defensive. They're making defensive decisions rather than practical decisions all the time. We've got Kellogg's, Nestle, and Sunsilk and all three of these clients, they just want to advertise. They just want to get their brand out there. They don't want to be creative. They don't want to take chances. They don't want to create a stir. It's our job to make an ad which will stand out to people in the room and say hey, have you seen the cool kid get out with the dudes in the garage and dance? [7508]
And the clients, they're above us so they get final say so if they think that if they say wild swooping statements like actually black people don't watch television, you can say, "Yeah, they do," but at the end of the day if they say they don't, they don't. It makes it really hard for us. It's kind of walking on egg shells. [7534]
They can be pretty hard. And the clients, they're above us so they get final say so if they think that if they say wild swooping statements like actually black people don't watch television, you can say, "Yeah, they do," but at the end of the day if they say they don't, they don't. It makes it really hard for us. It's kind of walking on egg shells. [7530],[7523]
Low medium. This is broad, though. You have like Kellogg's are more medium. Nestle are low medium. Sunsilk are very low. Sunsilk they just want to put hair, face, smile, ad. That's it. They don't want anything else and we can push and push and push as much as we want. [7509]
By round three or four of presenting to them, the brief is really been forgotten about. Clients service start doing it now because they start showing them the brief and saying, "Look, this is what you wanted. How can you get angry at us? We're giving you what you wanted." No, and there was always some excuse and us creatives do try not to be political. [7535],[7536]
These things are funny. Clients, as I said, they know what they don't like. So they'll write us a brief and we're pretty sure we've got it right and we got to them and they actually don't like this work. By round three or four of presenting to them, the brief is really been forgotten about. Clients service start doing it now because they start showing them the brief and saying, "Look, this is what you wanted. How can you get angry at us? We're giving you what you wanted." No, and there was always some excuse and us creatives do try not to be political. We're not client service, we don't try to get involved. We just sit there and [inaudible 00:22:21] back and forth and writing ideas. [7531]
what turns them on? It's karaoke, it's music videos. It's having a break, escape, it's all those kind of things. So we turned them all together, we put it in, we mixed it around and said, okay. We had a whole bunch of ideas. They got cut down to this karaoke and to this dancing. [7537]
Bitter, you know. If things were going well, then the relationship is good. If they're going badly, then suddenly the agency's about to get fired and client services is sweating. With this one, it was good. The clients on this, they might be old school and reporting to some boss and making defensive decisions, but they're nice people. When it works, it works and they're not ... you can't talk to them. You can say this is what we feel and stuff. They don't shut you down as they could have earlier if the job wasn't going well or as some clients can. I think what JWT has done and what Rob has started is a bit of a snowball effect. Most clients are here because, internationally they have to be here. But what Rob started was a push. For me, that is key to creativity and another reason why [inaudible 00:24:58] is that you push clients into new territories. Every job, just make it a little more creative, a little more creative, a little bit more creative. That kind of, even that Rob's left, that momentum hasn't stopped. I think they're starting to appreciate and see it. I think the rewards are coming from international, from their bosses. We're working on [inaudible 00:25:17] too and we've written such a good script that it's going to be an international ad which is [inaudible 00:25:23] exciting for me. [7512],[7528],[7524]
They don't shut you down as they could have earlier if the job wasn't going well or as some clients can. I think what JWT has done and what Rob has started is a bit of a snowball effect. Most clients are here because, internationally they have to be here. But what Rob started was a push. For me, that is key to creativity and another reason why [inaudible 00:24:58] is that you push clients into new territories. Every job, just make it a little more creative, a little more creative, a little bit more creative. That kind of, even that Rob's left, that momentum hasn't stopped. I think they're starting to appreciate and see it. I think the rewards are coming from international, from their bosses. We're working on [inaudible 00:25:17] too and we've written such a good script that it's going to be an international ad which is [inaudible 00:25:23] exciting for me. [7510]
I mean, client service and that, it's got to be tough. But our client service is very, very good. [7538]
It all ran very smoothly but like on Sunsilk job then it worked and the client will, they can never be wrong even if they are [7539]
Nicki Park, I'm sure you'll meet her maybe later. She's fantastic. Client service, they've got a hard job. They're really on the rope in a tug of war competition and they get stretched and pulled. But it was good. It all ran very smoothly but like on Sunsilk job then it worked and the client will, they can never be wrong even if they are. So they'll be shouting at us and going off and not to ask creative but to poor old client service and come back to us and say, "Sorry this is what's happened," and back and forth and back and forth. There's been a Sunsilk TV job which had been in the works for two years. I mean, client service and that, it's got to be tough. But our client service is very, very good. [7513],[7514]
Strategy. Also good, also good. We've got Lou and Davina who's head of strategy. They're amazing. Very strong woman. Another thing, [inaudible 00:26:42] she's very good here. Every cog works well. There's maybe one or two people who are a little bit loose, but I mean it's good. [7515]
Because it started off as a really big - like, campaign that could have sold a lot of product for them and then it's kind of been watered down to a campaign that's not really going to do anything, we don't think. That's basically it. [7420],[7429]
And this guy presented the idea to client, client loved that idea and when we tried to incorporate it into our bigger idea they basically said they don't want the bigger idea they just want the air time thing and it was very limited and very, like narrow minded. [7441]
Client got a presentation from another guy who was bringing in the cell phone air time, like thing so if you sent to a unique code you'd get airtime back from them. And this guy presented the idea to client, client loved that idea and when we tried to incorporate it into our bigger idea they basically said they don't want the bigger idea they just want the air time thing and it was very limited and very, like narrow minded. [7428],[7430],[7422],[7421]
like narrow minded. [7440]
Yeah, we presented the idea - the big idea to them and they liked it and they thought it was cool and everything involved. And then later on they came back and said "No, we want to just have this one element in it and that's it." We still have to sell four million bars, and. [7431]
It was pretty involved. Pretty daunting because they wanted us to sell eight billion bars this year, which is pretty crazy. So it was really like, we had high expectations there to meet and we could've met them but I don't think we will now. [7432],[7423],[7436]
No. The budget was too little for what they wanted. Time was pretty tight. [7437],[7424]
No, we went in with above, like what money they had and they know they'd have to choose which elements they wanted or didn't want to make the budget like that. [7438]
Obviously we just, we butted heads on the fact that they wanted to cap our, like three quarters of the campaign that we had thought of. So we spent a lot of time on it that they weren't going to run. They basically just felt that they had the money and they wanted to do what they wanted to do. [7433],[7439],[7425]
I think a lot of financial decision and some preference and maybe not really understanding the problem at hand. Yeah. I mean the relationship with Kit-Kat hasn't been the best for awhile anyway. So, there's always a bit of tension there. [7442],[7435],[7443],[7434]
Client service was cool and we already knew client service - the brand unit director, business unit director were kind of onboard halfway through the project so - obviously they aired more towards the client side because they're trying to make the relationships with the client and stuff so we had a bit of, not seeing eye to eye. But generally, it was fine. [7427],[7426]
Reference Tags
[7506] Authority bias,[7525] Organizational encouragement,[7527] Organizational encouragement,[7526] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[7529] Vague goals,[7516] Yielding conflict about ideas,[7517] Compromising conflict about ideas,[7511] Communicating ideas across domains,[7507] Inexperience,[7518] Win-win conflict about ideas,[7519] Win-win conflict about ideas,[7520] Win-win conflict about ideas,[7521] Win-win conflict about ideas,[7522] Win-win conflict about ideas,[7532] Conservatism,[7533] Status quo bias,[7508] Risk compensation,[7534] Forceful conflict about ideas,[7530] Insufficient Feedback,[7523] Yielding conflict about ideas,[7509] Risk compensation,[7535] Indecisive leadership,[7536] Vague goals,[7531] Insufficient Feedback,[7537] Empathetic disposition,[7512] Communicating ideas across domains,[7528] Organizational encouragement,[7524] Win-win conflict about ideas,[7510] Halo effect,[7538] Organizational encouragement,[7539] Forceful conflict about relationships,[7513] Organizing effectively,[7514] Quick resolution of relationship conflict,[7515] Organizing effectively,[7420] Peak-end rule,[7429] Scope creep,[7441] Reactive devaluation,[7428] Great example - External Influences,[7430] Insufficient Feedback,[7422] Peak-end rule,[7421] Premature idea evaluation,[7440] Dismissive,[7431] Insufficient Feedback,[7432] Communication issues,[7423] Peak-end rule,[7436] Unbalanced workload,[7437] Lack of resources,[7424] Planning fallacy,[7438] Lack of resources,[7433] Insufficient Feedback,[7439] Lack of resources,[7425] Planning fallacy,[7442] Alignment,[7435] Communication issues,[7443] Irreconcilable differences,[7434] Trust,[7427] Empathetic disposition,[7426] Yielding conflict about ideas

related tags

Sign Up and Start Learning

ABOUT ME
MADISON BARNETT
I get my inspiration from the fictional world. I’m a social geek. Completely exploit 24/365 catalysts for change whereas high standards in action items. Conveniently whiteboard multifunctional benefits without enabled leadership.
GET IN TOUCH
Quickly communicate covalent niche markets for maintainable sources. Collaboratively harness resource sucking experiences whereas cost effective meta-services.