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Needle-less injector/Red jet

N

Interviewee

27 Practice Person; Designer

Team Advantages

Team Disadvantages

0, 3

Project Outcome

Unsuccessful

Industry

Medical

Location

Chicago

Team Risk Tolerance

Low

Team Dynamics

TeamDynamics_Turnaround

Company

Needle-less injector/Red jet


The idea of, "Oh, it's needleless," that sounds great, but what it does is it has a very high pressure stream of liquid that basically tears a hole in your skin, that hurts more and it's a loud nasty noise. PROJECT ID [1976]
From the very beginning ... and they were partnering with another company. So our task was to try to figure out how to integrate their drug and their drug package with this other technology. First off, the team really didn't believe in it. We didn't think it was really a very good idea, and we told the client that. They said, "Yeah, we know there's some issues with it, but you know, work it out." [1949],[1948],[1950]
They said, "Yeah, we know there's some issues with it, but you know, work it out." [1947]
Yeah. From the very beginning ... and they were partnering with another company. So our task was to try to figure out how to integrate their drug and their drug package with this other technology. First off, the team really didn't believe in it. We didn't think it was really a very good idea, and we told the client that. They said, "Yeah, we know there's some issues with it, but you know, work it out." [1978],[1977]
And I don't think he was really communicating to the people who were making these partnering decisions. [1953],[1954]
And we brought that up to the client numerous times, and they just like, for whatever reason ... and they weren't very tightly involved with the program. They had a project manager assigned to it, but he wasn't really deeply involved with it. And I don't think he was really communicating to the people who were making these partnering decisions. [1952],[1951]
So we worked hard to try to come up with something that was reasonable, but the compromises [1979]
So we worked hard to try to come up with something that was reasonable, but the compromises that we needed to make just made it to be such a nasty device with really some really severe technical risks. [1955]
They had a project manager assigned to it, but he wasn't really deeply involved with it. And I don't think he was really communicating to the people who were making these partnering decisions [1982],[1980],[1981]
And it was very clear, no matter how hard we tried, it just was not getting through, 'cause he just wasn't the smartest guy there. Let's just put it that way. [1983],[1984]
cause he just wasn't the smartest guy there. Let's just put it that way. [1985]
I mean, he didn't really completely, no matter how many times you'd explain it to him, he didn't completely understand what the issues were [1986]
I mean, he didn't really completely, no matter how many times you'd explain it to him, he didn't completely understand what the issues were. And it was very clear, no matter how hard we tried, it just was not getting through, 'cause he just wasn't the smartest guy there. Let's just put it that way. I mean, he wasn't the most talented, his background was not in devices ... Excuse me. It was in materials. He had a Ph.D. in like polymer science. [1958],[1956],[1957]
"You know, we didn't think that was gonna work out anyway." [1989],[1990]
He was not particularly well qualified to be doing what he was doing. So, nice guy, really nice guy, but he never got it [1992],[1991]
He was not particularly well qualified to be doing what he was doing. So, nice guy, really nice guy, but he never got it. [1988],[1987]
He was not particularly well qualified to be doing what he was doing. So, nice guy, really nice guy, but he never got it. So we went through all the way to the end where we finally said that your package cannot do this in the end. I mean, we actually had a technical reason in the end why this just wouldn't work, and they finally ... It was funny 'cause like a month or two later, we found out that they said, "You know, we didn't think that was gonna work out anyway." [1959],[1960]
So we went through all the way to the end where we finally said that your package cannot do this in the end. I mean, we actually had a technical reason in the end why this just wouldn't work, and they finally ... It was funny 'cause like a month or two later, we found out that they said, "You know, we didn't think that was gonna work out anyway." [1961]
But you could just tell that somebody had made a decision in management [1993]
But you could just tell that somebody had made a decision in management ... well, I shouldn't say this. This is speculation. I think somebody made a decision in management. This is a promising technology, we're gonna partner with this company, we're gonna give them X number of dollars. And once that decision was made, I think it just is a big organization, and I think it just kind of flowed through the system. Some manager made that decision, or VP or something, and they were gonna take it all the way to the end. [1963],[1962],[1964]
They were disappointed, but you know, it wasn't ... in the end, I don't think they were that surprised. [1994]
and the disconnect with the client, that they weren't very involved with it. [1995]
No, I think that was it. I think the thing that made it less than a great project was the disconnect with the team with the concept, they didn't believe in it, and the disconnect with the client, that they weren't very involved with it. So that combination. You might be able to live with either one, but you couldn't live with them both together. [1966],[1965]
it was kind of disconnected, so none of them were very influential or didn't really do a whole lot within the project. It was just kind of, you know, keep it running till the end. [1996]
So I was actually working more with their partner than my client. [1967]
very vague. [1997]
By the way, I don't think that was a problem. I mean, it was appropriately vague 'cause it gave us a lot of room to do it in lots of different ways. [1998],[1968]
Yeah, like somebody's boss' boss knows exactly what they need, but we don't meet them until the final day of the project, yeah, that's bad. [1999],[1969]
Most of those were ... the technical problems were so severe, the technical needs were really driving the forms. Some of it was about user need, but in that case, because the technical problems were so severe, they drove a lot of the architecture. [2000]
eah, and he's very amenable kind of guy and had respect for us, but just didn't really understand what his role was in the project, and really didn't ... just didn't have a good basic understanding of what we were trying to do. And we saw that on other projects that he led, so it wasn't just us, I guess. [2001]
Yeah, and he's very amenable kind of guy and had respect for us, but just didn't really understand what his role was in the project, and really didn't ... just didn't have a good basic understanding of what we were trying to do. And we saw that on other projects that he led, so it wasn't just us, I guess. [1970]
it was good. I mean, occasionally it was a touch strained, but that was more because there was one guy who was being asked to leave the company, and that's when I took the project over. [2002]
It was good. Occasionally, it was a little ... it was good. I mean, occasionally it was a touch strained, but that was more because there was one guy who was being asked to leave the company, and that's when I took the project over. We had a new person that was just starting for human factors, so I wouldn't say it was strained, but it was ... we had some things we had to address. [1972],[1973],[1971]
Yeah, the people weren't excited about it, so that didn't help either. I think part of the reason we had a lot of new people involved with it and people leaving it and all was partly because it wasn't a very inspiring project. [1975],[1974],[2003]
Reference Tags
[1976] Law of the instrument,[1949] Premature idea evaluation,[1948] Sunk cost fallacy,[1950] Vague goals,[1947] Overconfidence bias,[1978] Alignment,[1977] Law of the instrument,[1953] Communication issues,[1954] Man blaming man,[1952] Lack of real innovation mandate,[1951] Insufficient Feedback,[1979] Compromising conflict about ideas,[1955] Compromising conflict about ideas,[1982] Alignment,[1980] Communication issues,[1981] Internal changes/challenges,[1983] Anchoring,[1984] Anecdotal fallacy,[1985] Irreconcilable differences,[1986] Alignment,[1958] Inexperience,[1956] Insufficient Feedback,[1957] Man blaming man,[1989] Conservatism,[1990] Ostrich effect,[1992] Alignment,[1991] Internal changes/challenges,[1988] Communication issues,[1987] Inexperience,[1959] Insufficient Feedback,[1960] Man blaming man,[1961] Hindsight bias,[1993] Authority bias,[1963] Lack of real innovation mandate,[1962] Ostrich effect,[1964] Sunk cost fallacy,[1994] Risk compensation,[1995] Alignment,[1966] Alignment,[1965] Lack of real innovation mandate,[1996] Lack of organizational encouragement,[1967] Great example - External Influences,[1997] Vague goals,[1998] Believes one has a hopeful path,[1968] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[1999] Authority bias,[1969] Communication issues,[2000] Anchoring,[2001] Inexperience,[1970] Inexperience,[2002] Internal changes/challenges,[1972] Lack of organizational encouragement,[1973] Resilience,[1971] Unresolved relationship conflict,[1975] Inexperience,[1974] Lack of challenging work,[2003] Lack of organizational encouragement

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