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National Health Service (NHS)

N

Interviewee

174 Researcher

Team Advantages

Team Disadvantages

2, 3

Project Outcome

Successful

Industry

Medical

Location

London

Team Risk Tolerance

Medium

Team Dynamics

TeamDynamics_FunandProductive

Company

National Health Service (NHS)


I think it was positive for me, but I don't know, I know that in parts it was difficult for team members and stuff, but I think that the overall outcome was good. [7815]
If I wouldn't be so good about putting myself forward for something, he'd try, and push me or help me to achieve things personally as well as thinking about what IDEO gets out it. He was thinking about what we individually get out of it as well. I think they're some of the reasons it was a success. [7853],[7854],[7855]
In terms of content. Yeah. I mean, there's things that we've done before, but this sort of project as a whole. There's bits of it that we've done before, but the project as a whole was kind of new so it was challenging for all of us to sort of push our knowledge and our expertise. [7822]
Nathan was sort of the project manager and he knew what things I'd like to try or what my strengths were or where I needed to push myself. If I wouldn't be so good about putting myself forward for something, he'd try, and push me or help me to achieve things personally as well as thinking about what IDEO gets out it. He was thinking about what we individually get out of it as well. I think they're some of the reasons it was a success. [7844]
I would think that was more a success in terms of personally. So, I started at IDEO working in a different, sort of ... I was working in support and that was probably the project where I said, I probably think of this as a success because personally I felt like it was a project where I really ... It changed my role, so I started doing more of the human factors type work on that project, and I worked really closely with the human factors team and with the clients so it sort of was a test of our skills and a test of working with a client that closely. We're sort of living with them for like a few days of every week. [7821]
Yeah, I think on that project as well, some of the clients had some personal transformations of they really feel like they were affected by working with us and learning from us and maybe not so much that we've changed the NHS, but we've had an impact on people, individual people and they sort of feel like they have learned a lot from working with us. So that's why I think it was successful. [7816]
We were working with the innovation and improvement agency from the NHS and they'd gone from 1,000 people to 40 people. It was kind of a stressful time for them, they were all reapplying for their jobs, but yeah, we sort of managed to hang onto our team [7830]
Particularly this one called C. Diff., I don't know if you've heard of it. So we were sort of looking at how ... We did lots of observations in hospitals and a couple of hospitals in Birmingham. [7856]
Then we did a project in hospitals looking at how they could use a design and innovation approach on one of their high priority areas, which is around infectious diseases. Particularly this one called C. Diff., I don't know if you've heard of it. So we were sort of looking at how ... We did lots of observations in hospitals and a couple of hospitals in Birmingham. [7843]
Probably like two key decisions makers or three key decision makers, but then there were lots of stakeholders who sort of would've influenced it along the way, but yeah. Then, you know, working with the NHS as well because it's a government department. They have so many, sort of, above the client, there's so many people that go right up to say, the prime minister or whatever, that influences public policy with regard to healthcare. But relation to the project, at least two key decision makers, but I know there were other people involved as well. [7824]
Because I think once a project starts, you know, we have relative autonomy on a project, but I think at a certain stage everybody on the team makes decisions, you know, different things and a lot of the time we were together, we try to be quite collaborative and make decisions as a team, but there's certain points where you gotta make some decisions on your own, but I think everybody would've been involved in decision making though as well. [7845]
. They're kind of, I think would make, in some senses, make an excuse of like, "This is government agency, we're slow moving, it's public policy. We've gotta follow all these rules." They probably would've made excuses as to why they didn't want to do things because of certain reasons or because they're a government agency. [7848]
I think they probably would've said that their risk tolerance was a bit higher than their other colleagues because it's a sensitive area in healthcare. I know even trying to do observations, it took us a long time to sort of set that up because it's working in health care, so we can't just do our normal go in, take lots of photos [7857]
I think probably by the end, they probably would be a bit more ... because they've done it once, they'd probably be a bit more ... if we did another project with them, they might be a bit more risk accept- ... You know, they might be more willing to take some more risks. [7817]
nd I think in retrospect, if we had our time over we would've definitely pushed back and say, "I thought we wanted a hospital in London." Just because the clients coming along with us a lot of the time, [7858],[7859]
Probably the most stressful thing with regard to time and budget was the fact that the hospital they picked was in Birmingham and I think in retrospect, if we had our time over we would've definitely pushed back and say, "I thought we wanted a hospital in London." Just because the clients coming along with us a lot of the time, but we were doing most of the work here at IDEO and not all the team members would go. Sometimes it would be just some of us who would go and that really put a lot of stress on the team, so I think in retrospect, we would've pushed back on location cause that was probably the biggest ... You know, that added in to our time and our budget. [7841]
think we still delivered to the best of our ability given the time and budget, but I think that was the biggest factor that could've influenced what we delivered at the end of the day [7842]
I know one guy sort of started breaking down and crying in one of interviews and said, "You know, I've worked her for 30 years and this is the first time anyone's asked me what I think." He was really great, he became sort of one of our poster children for the project. His stories were kind of famous, it was like Ted the porter or something. [7833]
Oh, yeah, so they selected these two hospitals which had sort of bad reputations in regard to this infectious disease or infectious diseases in general. So we went and literally myself and a colleague case say in wards trying to look inconspicuous, which is kind of difficult. If they see anybody, because they get so many people from the department of health coming, doing different audits and different surveys and checking up on them, it was very hard to gain their trust and to just let them know that we weren't trying to get any of them sacked or to do a report on them or that we weren't spying on them. So we did lots of sitting around in hospitals, feeling in the way. We also held ... Some of my colleagues interviewed lots of different stakeholders so getting away from the normal talking to nurses and doctors and consultants, which we did as well, and we also spoke to some of the porters that worked in the hospital. I know one guy sort of started breaking down and crying in one of interviews and said, "You know, I've worked her for 30 years and this is the first time anyone's asked me what I think." He was really great, he became sort of one of our poster children for the project. His stories were kind of famous, it was like Ted the porter or something. [7818],[7826]
Some of my colleagues interviewed lots of different stakeholders so getting away from the normal talking to nurses and doctors and consultants, which we did as well, and we also spoke to some of the porters [7861],[7862]
You know, I've worked her for 30 years and this is the first time anyone's asked me what I think." He was really great, he became sort of one of our poster children for the project. His stories were kind of famous, it was like Ted the porter or something. [7860]
I guess we sort of realized quite early on that other people who work in healthcare, you've got to be a special type of person to do the job [7863]
So spoke to lots of different people. We held a workshop where some of the people came to tell their stories and to help us to try, and design new ideas. What else did we do? Did other sort of research. Yeah. I think that was. I don't know if we did anything sort of [inaudible 00:24:23] or ... Yeah, I think that was kind of it really. It was mainly sort of immersing yourselves in the environment to try, and understand what it was like because I guess we sort of realized quite early on that other people who work in healthcare, you've got to be a special type of person to do the job. Especially some of the, what they call domestics who are like nurses aids. They have a really tough job. I mean, you know, it's not pretty, and they don't get paid much, and they've gotta do a pretty hardcore job. [7827]
So it was kind of realizing ... It was just immersing ourselves in that so that we could actually understand what the reality is for them on a day to day basis. I don't think you really understand unless you've walked a mile in their shoes as it were so I think we just tried to understand what the reality was on the ground rather than, you know, they have lots of reports from the department of health about what the policy is regarding infectious diseases and what you should do. It was just to understand what it's actually like in reality. [7834]
I don't think you really understand unless you've walked a mile in their shoes as it were so I think we just tried to understand what the reality was on the ground rather than, you know, [7865],[7864]
Nobody wants to have dirty hospital or to do things that are gonna put the patient at risk, but there's just sometimes there's just things that are in their way that ... I mean the reality is, they can only do what they have time for. Their budgets been cut or the hospital doesn't provide uniforms so they're wearing the uniform home or they're wearing their own clothes. So it was kind of realizing ... It was just immersing ourselves in that so that we could actually understand what the reality is for them on a day to day basis. I don't think you really understand unless you've walked a mile in their shoes as it were so I think we just tried to understand what the reality was on the ground rather than, you know, they have lots of reports from the department of health about what the policy is regarding infectious diseases and what you should do. It was just to understand what it's actually like in reality. [7828]
. Going up and down to Birmingham a lot. Because it's only like ... I know a lot people will do this on a day to day basis, but it's like two hours on the train, but you know, say for example it's like three hours commuting. But hanging out in hospitals and sort of really doing the immersion helped to strengthen the relationship and I think it just took a bit of time for those bonds to form. [7851]
But I think when you're ... I think you find it here when you travel with your colleagues, that's when you really get to know them, that's when you sort of ... You know, it's like, I don't think you really know some- ... Well it's the best opportunity to get to know somebody really well is when you travel with them so I think when we were doing the observations and stuff, that was when we really sort of got to know them and I think by the end of it, you would say that some of them were definitely friends more than ... We built sort of a personal bond with them as well. [7840]
ou know, it's like, I don't think you really know some- ... Well it's the best opportunity to get to know somebody really well is when you travel with them so I think when we were doing the observations and stuff, that was when we really sort of got to know them and I think by the end of it, you would say that some of them were definitely friends more than [7866]
But I know at certain points, there was times when they were trying to push back on certain things and I know definitely like for example the choice of hospital was a contentious issue and it was just sort of trying to convey to them that, yes it's more convenient for us have a hospital in London, but I think it will impact positively on the outcome of the whole project. So I know that was a contentious issue at the start, but I think overall the relationship was good and I think definitely the important moments during the project that were a bit contentious, but overall at the end I think the relationship was good. [7847]
So I know that was a contentious issue at the start, but I think overall the relationship was good and I think definitely the important moments during the project that were a bit contentious, but overall at the end I think the relationship was good. [7839]
I think it was just, you know, definitely it was hard when we were sort of in different locations so I think when we came together and we just sort of listening to what their concerns were because I suppose some of the time doing things for them, like for example, doing observations in hospitals, that's the first time they'd ever done anything like that so it's just being understanding of the fact that, you know, the agency they're working for they've just gone from 1,000 people to 40. Even some of the people we were working with were reapplying for their jobs whilst they were working with us. So it's kind of having a bit of understanding that they're going through a tough time, they don't know if they're gonna have a job next week so we just have to be really understanding of that fact. [7837]
I think it was just, you know, definitely it was hard when we were sort of in different locations so I think when we came together and we just sort of listening to what their concerns were because I suppose some of the time doing things for them, like for example, doing observations in hospitals, that's the first time they'd ever done anything like that so it's just being understanding of the fact that, you know, the agency they're working for they've just gone from 1,000 people to 40. Even some of the people we were working with were reapplying for their jobs whilst they were working with us. So it's kind of having a bit of understanding that they're going through a tough time, they don't know if they're gonna have a job next week so we just have to be really understanding of that fact. They were all going through stressful time, they've seen hundreds of their colleagues being made redundant so we had to just ... When they had an issue we had to just understand that for them, doing something that we think is normal, going out and doing observations or interviewing people was a big stretch for them. We just had to talk it through. This is their concerns and try, and find a way to meet in the middle. [7825]
They were all going through stressful time, they've seen hundreds of their colleagues being made redundant so we had to just ... When they had an issue we had to just understand that for them, doing something that we think is normal, going out and doing observations or interviewing people was a big stretch for them. We just had to talk it through. This is their concerns and try, and find a way to meet in the middle. [7835]
they've just gone from 1,000 people to 40. Even some of the people we were working with were reapplying for their jobs whilst they were working with us. So it's kind of having a bit of understanding that they're going through a tough time, they don't know if they're gonna have a job next week so we just have to be really understanding of that fact. They were all going through stressful time, they've seen hundreds of their colleagues being made redundant so we had to just [7831]
So, I knew her really, really well so again, it was a case of it was like I was working with a friend as well. Because I'd worked with her on loads of projects it makes it that much easier because I sort of knew her quite well and again, that was earlier on in my time here so she would try, and ... I'm not the most confident so she would be trying to push me towards, you know, if there were things that I could try that were new, she would be pushing me to do that, so that was good. [7846],[7849]
I think it makes it easier in some ways because so much of our knowledge and experience is tied up in peoples hands so all the knowledge resides with people. So it's if you're working with the same people, you have that same sort of bank of knowledge and you can call upon ... I guess there's something to be said for changing project teams because then the knowledge gets dispersed and you sort of like ... You know, cause we're really bad at knowledge sharing. [7819],[7832]
You know, cause we're really bad at knowledge sharing. [7867]
I guess, from a personal development point of view, they can help you to achieve things like that. I guess it makes the startup phase a bit quicker in that you know this person, you know their working style. [7868]
Yeah. So sometimes you only hear about something through ... You would only hear about something through a person so like if you do a really good presentation or something that's really usable again, unless you go and work on another project team, people won't hear about it. But there's something to be said from a personal point of view, I find working with people that I know, both good and bad, in that they know me quite well personally and they know my skills and what things I'm good and what things I'd like to work on. I guess, from a personal development point of view, they can help you to achieve things like that. I guess it makes the startup phase a bit quicker in that you know this person, you know their working style. [7823],[7820]
I think the thing I would find most difficult was if it was somebody I didn't get along with personally. I think other things you can kind of overcome whereas if it's personal, personal is a thing that might be more difficult. [7869]
Possibly. I mean ... So I have one example of bad [inaudible 00:32:25] and I haven't really worked with those people again. I suppose it would, but ... I suppose it depends on what you feel ... what caused the previous situation to be bad. If it was a personal thing or if it was a situation or if it was the project or if it was the client or I don't know, a whole bunch of factors, rather than the person. I think the thing I would find most difficult was if it was somebody I didn't get along with personally. I think other things you can kind of overcome whereas if it's personal, personal is a thing that might be more difficult. [7852]
You know, there was at the hospital, there was a guy who was head of infection control and he was not a key member of our team, but we would've gone to meet with him a few times and he came to our workshop and stuff. He was very negative so I guess, after every time we'd meet with him, we'd sort of all get together and comfort each other because he was just so negative and would just shut everything down. But I think it strengthens your bonds with people when you come through tough times. I think that project, there was definitely moments where it was tough, but when you come out of it, it feels like, you know ... There was emails like ages after when we realized something had been launched or I can't remember. But we still feel like we have a bond having been through the experience of this project. [7829],[7838]
But I think it strengthens your bonds with people when you come through tough times. I think that project, there was definitely moments where it was tough, but when you come out of it, it feels like, you know ... [7872],[7871],[7870]
So we had one person who actually came over from the states to work on it and then ... So I suppose it was difficult for her in that she was away from home and things and spending her time in UK traveling up to dirty hospitals in Birmingham. Probably not the best way to ... But I think probably, you know, there were other tough moments and it strengthens your relationships with people when you have those sort of tough moments, when you come through them. [7836]
Yeah, they were good. So we had one person who actually came over from the states to work on it and then ... So I suppose it was difficult for her in that she was away from home and things and spending her time in UK traveling up to dirty hospitals in Birmingham. Probably not the best way to ... But I think probably, you know, there were other tough moments and it strengthens your relationships with people when you have those sort of tough moments, when you come through them. You know, there was at the hospital, there was a guy who was head of infection control and he was not a key member of our team, but we would've gone to meet with him a few times and he came to our workshop and stuff. He was very negative so I guess, after every time we'd meet with him, we'd sort of all get together and comfort each other because he was just so negative and would just shut everything down. But I think it strengthens your bonds with people when you come through tough times. I think that project, there was definitely moments where it was tough, but when you come out of it, it feels like, you know ... There was emails like ages after when we realized something had been launched or I can't remember. But we still feel like we have a bond having been through the experience of this project. [7850]
Reference Tags
[7815] Great example - Individual & Team outcomes for future efforts,[7853] Decisive leadership,[7854] Empathetic disposition,[7855] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[7822] Balance of challenging work,[7844] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[7821] Anecdotal fallacy,[7816] Great example - Individual & Team outcomes for future efforts,[7830] Internal changes/challenges,[7856] Empathetic disposition,[7843] pro-innovation bias,[7824] Great example - External Influences,[7845] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[7848] Risk compensation,[7857] Risk compensation,[7817] Great example - Individual & Team outcomes for future efforts,[7858] Communication issues,[7859] Hindsight bias,[7841] Planning fallacy,[7842] Planning fallacy,[7833] Empathetic disposition,[7818] Great example - Individual & Team outcomes for future efforts,[7826] Identifiable victim effect,[7861] Collaborative-Creative Disposition,[7862] Methodologically creative,[7860] Empathetic disposition,[7863] Empathetic disposition,[7827] Identifiable victim effect,[7834] Empathetic disposition,[7865] Collaborative-Creative Disposition,[7864] Empathetic disposition,[7828] Identifiable victim effect,[7851] Unbalanced workload pressure,[7840] Organizing effectively,[7866] Organizing effectively,[7847] Resilience,[7839] Optimism,[7837] Listening disposition,[7825] Compromising conflict about ideas,[7835] Empathetic disposition,[7831] Internal changes/challenges,[7846] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[7849] Trust,[7819] Great example - Individual & Team outcomes for future efforts,[7832] Win-win conflict about ideas,[7867] Communication issues,[7868] Organizing effectively,[7823] Communicating ideas across domains,[7820] Great example - Individual & Team outcomes for future efforts,[7869] Alignment,[7852] Unresolved relationship conflict,[7829] Identifiable victim effect,[7838] Listening disposition,[7872] Believes one has high agency,[7871] Optimism,[7870] Resilience,[7836] Empathetic disposition,[7850] Trust

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