Skip to content

Knorr

K

Interviewee

1 Creative

Team Disadvantages

0, 2

Project Outcome

Unsuccessful

Industry

Food

Location

London

Team Risk Tolerance

Medium

Team Dynamics

TeamDynamics_Indecisive

Company

Knorr


He's from Hell's Kitchen, anyway. He come out in the press saying he thinks Knorr Stock Cubes is the best ingredient in the kitchen so it was all about this quote from him saying best effing ingredient in the world, he said, so we wanted to use that as the strapline and at the first the client was all up for it and stuff, and we met Marco and everything, and basically the client kept changing their mind. They were so indecisive that in the end with actually got to the executional stage and said we're not happy. [42],[41],[43]
we met Marco and everything, and basically the client kept changing their mind. They were so indecisive that in the end with actually got to the executional stage and said we're not happy. [81]
It was like no matter what we could have done for them they wouldn't have made a decision. In the end, there was a total rebrief and then they put two teams on to it so the client was so upset, but, that's, you know what I mean. Luckily it was solved, they've got a new ad. [82]
We've done about 10 ideas for them, and they just kept steering us the wrong direction. The two clients would go away and they'd just confuse each other. [84],[83]
We've done about 10 ideas for them, and they just kept steering us the wrong direction. The two clients would go away and they'd just confuse each other. In the end when they finally got to the stage of where we showed them the ad, they were like, not sure about this, now. It was like no matter what we could have done for them they wouldn't have made a decision. In the end, there was a total rebrief and then they put two teams on to it so the client was so upset, but, that's, you know what I mean. Luckily it was solved, they've got a new ad. [44],[45]
I didn't, it was just because I was working on it, the got two other teams to work on it so, that was very frustrating because we did so much work [46]
I didn't, it was just because I was working on it, the got two other teams to work on it so, that was very frustrating because we did so much work. [85]
I didn't, it was just because I was working on it, the got two other teams to work on it so, that was very frustrating because we did so much work. PROJECT ID [86]
That's a huge amount. We honestly spent so much time, we've got nothing to show for it now. Because [inaudible 00:28:15] anything. [48],[49],[47]
because on everything they just kept changing their minds about ... [87]
That was a print campaign which isn't particularly big but it was like doing a huge project because you just spent so much time, because on everything they just kept changing their minds about ... [50],[51]
But then when you do that they're, "Ooh, no, I can't." And then they just kept changing their minds, so ... PROJECT ID [89]
They're open to it. They're open to it. In terms of they encouraged us to be as creative as we could. But then when you do that they're, "Ooh, no, I can't." And then they just kept changing their minds, so ... [88],[54],[52],[53]
because he was so open to stuff, she would be able to persuade him not and she was more junior than him. So it was like, she's making the calls and he is more senior and he was open and she was like, "Oh." It was a bit of a nightmare. [57]
I think the personalities to be honest. Because we met the client quite a number of times and they would say something, then the two of them would go back and have a conversation between ... They're almost like a husband and wife, this client. Because he was quite open to stuff and she was really conservative, so the two of them, because he was so open to stuff, she would be able to persuade him not and she was more junior than him. So it was like, she's making the calls and he is more senior and he was open and she was like, "Oh." It was a bit of a nightmare. [59],[56],[58],[55]
she would be able to persuade him not and she was more junior than him. So it was like, she's making the calls and he is more senior and he was open and she was like, "Oh." It was a bit of a nightmare. [91],[92],[90]
That's interesting because when they do pitches for new accounts, they reckon the chemistry when they come to pitch is really interesting because do you want to work for these people, do they get on even the agency, because if they don't, why would you even want to work with them. You want to be working with a team who are solid and they like each other. [60]
No, when you do a pitch you'll have a creative director but the actual managing director and the account people and the planner, do those people who are representing that agency in that pitch, do those people get on? Because they're representing the agency in terms of do I want these people working for me? [62],[61]
They do, yes, because at the end of the day, you can be creative but you do want the project or whatever it is to run smoothly. [64],[63]
So we had to do a recipe of how he uses it, [inaudible 00:31:40], it gets more and more complex. And then they would, they weren't sure about how important that was, so, "Is that important or is it the fact that Marco [inaudible 00:31:48] more important?" It was just all over the shop. [93]
It was just a matter of tell people that Marco Pierre White, again it was actually more complex than that. It wasn't just tell people that Marco Pierre White said this was the best effing ingredient in the world, it was how he uses it as well. So we had to do a recipe of how he uses it, [inaudible 00:31:40], it gets more and more complex. And then they would, they weren't sure about how important that was, so, "Is that important or is it the fact that Marco [inaudible 00:31:48] more important?" It was just all over the shop. [65]
So we had to do a recipe of how he uses it, [inaudible 00:31:40], it gets more and more complex. And then they would, they weren't sure about how important that was, so, "Is that important or is it the fact that Marco [inaudible 00:31:48] more important?" It was just all over the shop. [94]
That was here, yes. [95]
It's about mental inspiration. Like I said, when I used to work at last agency they did that Guinness surfing one, the Guinness Surfer ad. Walter, one of the guys who wrote that, he worked there, and he was really motivating. You'd go and have a chat with him and you'd come out really motivated. To be honest with you that's part of the job of creative director as well. Obviously it's their interest to motivate the team to come back and give you their best ideas. It's really important. It's massively important. [66]
To be honest with you that's part of the job of creative director as well. Obviously it's their interest to motivate the team to come back and give you their best ideas. It's really important. It's massively important. [96],[97]
If I was a creative director, I wouldn't want a diverse department. Yes. The actual diversity between two people in a team. It's tricky because it doesn't happen a lot but you do get teams that break up. The thing is, to be honest with you, you don't really want that to happen. Because the thing is, if you're the creative director and one of your team split up it leaves you in a bit of an awkward position. So I think diversity between two people in the team, it isn't massively important but you don't like to think that the two people sitting there coming up with the same ideas all day, you'd like to think that, and that's usually the case, they don't come up with the same ideas, even if they do seem similar. [67]
So I think diversity between two people in the team, it isn't massively important but you don't like to think that the two people sitting there coming up with the same ideas all day, you'd like to think that, and that's usually the case, they don't come up with the same ideas, even if they do seem similar. [98]
You do want, if you have a department of creatives you want the teams to be different, definitely, because you have all different types of projects on and you think someone's more suited to that than others. [68]
No, they didn't research, and to be honest with you, looking back, I almost wish they did because at least they would have had something to go by. So, well, the research said that was good, we should do that, whereas they didn't knowing themselves what was good, so. [99]
No, they didn't research, and to be honest with you, looking back, I almost wish they did because at least they would have had something to go by. So, well, the research said that was good, we should do that, whereas they didn't knowing themselves what was good, so. It was a bit of a nightmare. See, research is a bit of a hot potato as well, to be honest. People say if research is so good then how come there's so much bad advertising out there? Research used in the right way can be okay, but there's loads of instances where a great idea ... I don't know if you've seen it, there's an Arnold Worldwide did this little example, they did the 1984 Apple ad, have you seen that? They did that as an animatic, which is how most work gets viewed in research groups. And they showed that recently and they filmed the group's response to it, because normal people don't really know that ad. And the response is fantastic at how much they slagged it off. Yet it was this pioneering ad. I don't know, have you seen that, have you? [69]
We like doing it because we don't like to waste time on projects, we like to see what people want and working within the area where we can be most creative, otherwise you waste time. Because time is so important in terms of coming up with a great idea. If you come up with a great ideas and they don't go nowhere you get frustrated. If you said they're the premises, just try to be as creative as you can in those premises, and then you usually can come up with, because then you've used that time productively to do the best piece of creative in those parameters, [100]
Yes, we went over, there's a thing in the campaign I spoke about, creative presented to clients and whether it's a good idea or not. Again it depends, it depends on the creatives as well, because some creatives don't like it. We like doing it because we don't like to waste time on projects, we like to see what people want and working within the area where we can be most creative, otherwise you waste time. Because time is so important in terms of coming up with a great idea. If you come up with a great ideas and they don't go nowhere you get frustrated. If you said they're the premises, just try to be as creative as you can in those premises, and then you usually can come up with, because then you've used that time productively to do the best piece of creative in those parameters, so we like to do that. And it's just the actual explaining of your idea, there's very few people, I think, who I would trust to do a better job. The odd [inaudible 00:37:02] very odd [inaudible 00:37:03] man to be honest. Personally I prefer, but most creatives, oh well, [inaudible 00:37:07] most but a lot, don't want to present [70]
Yes, we went over, there's a thing in the campaign I spoke about, creative presented to clients and whether it's a good idea or not. Again it depends, it depends on the creatives as well, because some creatives don't like it. We like doing it because we don't like to waste time on projects, we like to see what people want and working within the area where we can be most creative, otherwise you waste time. Because time is so important in terms of coming up with a great idea. If you come up with a great ideas and they don't go nowhere you get frustrated. If you said they're the premises, just try to be as creative as you can in those premises, and then you usually can come up with, because then you've used that time productively to do the best piece of creative in those parameters, so we like to do that. And it's just the actual explaining of your idea, there's very few people, I think, who I would trust to do a better job. The odd [inaudible 00:37:02] very odd [inaudible 00:37:03] man to be honest. Personally I prefer, but most creatives, oh well, [inaudible 00:37:07] most but a lot, don't want to present. [71]
It seemed fine. Because like we didn't like we weren't like rude or anything to each other, it's just that they were so indecisive, so it's not much we can do if we've got a client who keeps changing his mind, we can persuade him all we like and he'll say yes, and go away, make a phone call after he's thought about it a bit and say actually no to the account person who will then feed back to us, so. Sometimes he would say where he was uncomfortable with, but if we said, "Okay, in that case why don't we try this?" He'll go, "Oh, all right." Then go away, think about it, and then ... I wasn't like sitting there I hate your guts. [73],[72]
it's just that they were so indecisive, so it's not much we can do if we've got a client who keeps changing his mind, we can persuade him all we like and he'll say yes, and go away, [101]
t's just that they were so indecisive, so it's not much we can do if we've got a client who keeps changing his mind, we can persuade him all we like and he'll say yes, and go away [102]
And it was like, it's quite interesting, because when you work on a project like that and you spend so much time on it, whatever your end product is to show for all that pain, you want to make it as good as possible, because of all those hours you spent on it, [104]
And it was like, it's quite interesting, because when you work on a project like that and you spend so much time on it, whatever your end product is to show for all that pain, you want to make it as good as possible, because of all those hours you spent on it, when he does try to tweet things, you probably automatically become more reluctant because the whole time you're trying to save it because you've spent so much time on it. You're just trying to salvage what you can. So when they say, "Can we change it?" You're a bit like not really, because you're going to make it worse. [75],[74]
when he does try to tweet things, you probably automatically become more reluctant because the whole time you're trying to save it because you've spent so much time on it. [103]
Luckily we already knew the accountant quite well with actually helped, we get on quite well with him, so. We didn't make light of it because it wasn't funny but luckily the team that we worked with we got on quite well with so that helped. So it was just business, really. [76]
We had a creative director who had a little bit of influence but not lots. [77]
He wasn't around very much he was on holidays and stuff so it was a little bit left up to us to be honest. [78]
I don't know if it would have made much difference if he'd have been around, but if we had a great creative director they may have had an influence or it may have I'm not sure to be honest because the client was so bad I'm not too sure what he could have done. [105],[79]
The only thing I will say is, we'd a had a great account person to handle the client better that might have helped. [80]
Reference Tags
[42] Indecisive leadership,[41] Insufficient Feedback,[43] Man blaming man,[81] Indecisive leadership,[82] Internal changes/challenges,[84] Alignment,[83] Indecisive leadership,[44] Insufficient Feedback,[45] Man blaming man,[46] Unbalanced workload pressure,[85] Effort justification,[86] Reactance,[48] Effort justification,[49] Planning fallacy,[47] Unbalanced workload pressure,[87] Indecisive leadership,[50] Insufficient Feedback,[51] Unbalanced workload pressure,[89] Irreconcilable differences,[88] Indecisive leadership,[54] Lack of real innovation mandate,[52] Insufficient Feedback,[53] Risk compensation,[57] Forceful conflict about ideas,[59] Insufficient Feedback,[56] Man blaming woman,[58] Risk compensation,[55] Vague roles,[91] Conservatism,[92] Indecisive leadership,[90] Yielding conflict about relationships,[60] Trust,[62] Organizational encouragement,[61] Trust,[64] Organizational encouragement,[63] Trust,[93] Communication issues,[65] Authority bias,[94] Indecisive leadership,[95] Planning fallacy,[66] Organizational encouragement,[96] Believes one has a hopeful path,[97] Organizational encouragement,[67] Absence of diverse skill backgrounds,[98] Irrational escalation,[68] Communicating ideas across domains,[99] Hindsight bias,[69] Confirmation bias,[100] Creative Confidence,[70] Solitude disposition when stuck,[71] Lack of trust,[73] Indecisive leadership,[72] Insufficient Feedback,[101] Indecisive leadership,[102] Internal changes/challenges,[104] Sunk cost fallacy,[75] Believes one has a hopeful path,[74] Effort justification,[103] Reactance,[76] Trust,[77] Lack of organizational encouragement,[78] Lack of organizational encouragement,[105] Internal changes/challenges,[79] Lack of challenging work,[80] Lack of organizational encouragement

related tags

Sign Up and Start Learning

ABOUT ME
MADISON BARNETT
I get my inspiration from the fictional world. I’m a social geek. Completely exploit 24/365 catalysts for change whereas high standards in action items. Conveniently whiteboard multifunctional benefits without enabled leadership.
GET IN TOUCH
Quickly communicate covalent niche markets for maintainable sources. Collaboratively harness resource sucking experiences whereas cost effective meta-services.