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Kingfisher

K

Interviewee

2 Art Director

Team Disadvantages

0, 3

Project Outcome

Successful

Industry

Alcohol

Location

London

Team Risk Tolerance

High

Team Dynamics

TeamDynamics_FunandProductive

Company

Kingfisher


India's number one love but despite this advertising the advertising was just the kind of advertising you'd expect to see in India. It was just some kind of cheesy pictures of Indian people. A little bit wacky and a bit crazy. [139],[140],[138]
He could put that into Photoshop and then paint over the top of it in order to get the desired result. [141]
I also hand painted ... It looked really nice, I suppose and we ... we went to see Nick with the idea. There was another team working on it as well. We beat them and he liked this and he said, all right, this is what we should do. We sold it to the client and they bought it. We didn't have that much money, we had to ... we worked with the administrator from the States and the way he works, he needed photographs of people in these poses so then he could apply it. He could put that into Photoshop and then paint over the top of it in order to get the desired result. [124],[123]
We beat them and he liked this and he said, all right, this is what we should do. [142]
t could add more money so in that respect it was more enjoyable and fun to do. We really took control over it. [143]
We changed [inaudible 00:23:43] and this young photographer went to Ilford which has got quite a large Asian community. She went down there and took photos of Asian people in these poses for him and then we sent them away to him to paint over so it was ... we did pretty much a lot of the work that I suppose you wouldn't normally do. It could add more money so in that respect it was more enjoyable and fun to do. We really took control over it. [126],[127],[125]
It's kind of funny. You go down to these places and you ask to take their picture and they're immediately suspicious and they want to know why. A lot of them just say no, they take [inaudible 00:24:35] and a lot of them are very religious and they find that's for a beer advertising and they say no. It was quite hard work to get six people to get to take their picture. [144]
Yeah. We paid them 50 quid or so. It was fun but in the same vein it was quite hard work to do but once we done it and you see the poster up on the street it's always rewarding. So I guess that was a good one. [128]
But here it's only really associated with Curry Houses and even so, the Cobra beer is probably I'd say the one that all my friends would pick over Kingfisher just because it's more popular than ... I don't know why it's more popular. It's supposedly less gassy, but I don't-. It's just the one that everyone drinks. [145],[146]
He gave us complete freedom and every time we got to a stage where we had to show the client something, he always liked it and he never really made us change anything. It's always so important tog et a client that is on board with you because a lot of the time, especially here as well, some of the really big clients ... I suppose being a little brand as well may be more freedom but some of the big clients like Kellogg for example, they'll always make you change it for whatever reason. It's always a battle between us and the client to get your creative idea out. Maybe being small probably helped that. [148]
Sort of understands a good idea. He liked the idea and the client was ... I really think he was a bit of a boozer but he was just really good and he just liked the idea and said do it. [147]
We had a huge kind of freedom. We really could climb and Paul Clerkly was the account manager on it, who's really good as well. Sort of understands a good idea. He liked the idea and the client was ... I really think he was a bit of a boozer but he was just really good and he just liked the idea and said do it. He gave us complete freedom and every time we got to a stage where we had to show the client something, he always liked it and he never really made us change anything. It's always so important tog et a client that is on board with you because a lot of the time, especially here as well, some of the really big clients ... I suppose being a little brand as well may be more freedom but some of the big clients like Kellogg for example, they'll always make you change it for whatever reason. It's always a battle between us and the client to get your creative idea out. Maybe being small probably helped that. [130],[129]
Time ... timing seemed to be okay I remember. Because we had time to go out and photograph and send those shots over to the States, so it was a bit of time on it and budget was a bit of a factor. [131]
It's just all, it's material that we've got and it all just looked so stupid. I don't even know why they do things over there. I think that's where he got the idea from. He said it and that was the point ... you never just present one idea. One of sort of three or four that we presented but that was the one Nick liked and eventually made it. [149],[150],[151]
No, I think... no we were at work. In fact, I think James had the initial idea of, despite this advertising so really I just started laughing at the Indians really and the way they advertised. I think we just had a lot of material of these people in Kingfisher branded clothes and a lot of the range of Kingfisher stuff that they did over there in India. They're all really quite cheesy and their poses and they have like a Kingfisher calendar and I think they do some motoration as well. [154],[153],[152]
We never actually got to meet the client. It's always good to meet the client, really, and present your own work if at all possible. I think because they are actually based in India it was kind of difficult. I think we had to conference calls with them. Never actually met the guy but Paul had a pretty good relationship with him and that's always a good thing. Our relationship with the client I suppose was a bit distant but in that case it seemed like they liked the work anyway, so it was probably okay to get on with it really, I guess. [132]
It was pretty good. I suppose it was James and Ian. Paul Clerkly. I think because Nick had an awful lot on he gave it to Richard and me and we were seeing the creative team here to creative direct and once the client ... once the idea had been bought it's just sort of, get on with it, really. You have maybe deadlines or timings being what they were, which I seem to remember they're okay, it's just how are you going to do it, what are you going to do, and when are you going to do it, really. Just get on with it, really. [133],[134]
And the fact that the client liked the idea and just wanted us to get on with it and weren't research ... it was pretty smooth running. Just went ahead and did it really. It was all pretty good. [156],[157],[155]
Well, as for them. Yeah, no, it was fine. I mean, Paul is a very good guy. We get on with him. He's a new business man now so he's always good to know, pitches and stuff. He's a good guy. He's a good account man. There wasn't any problems, really. And the fact that the client liked the idea and just wanted us to get on with it and weren't research ... it was pretty smooth running. Just went ahead and did it really. It was all pretty good. [136],[135]
Yeah, I suppose when we actually had shots and had the illustrator and the art work that's when you get down to details and you always look to creative director to direct you on that and you'd take him a few different variations and look for his guidance. I seem to remember we wanted to go a bit mad and weird the way it ended up and Rich and Ian sort of pulled us back a bit. Rightly or wrongly. I don't know about that. Yeah, we were all guided by them and by Nick as well, at the time. [137]
Reference Tags
[139] Anecdotal fallacy,[140] Cultural differences,[138] Pessimism bias,[141] Believes one has a hopeful path,[124] Believes one has a hopeful path,[123] Effort justification,[142] Decisive leadership,[143] Believes one has a hopeful path,[126] Appropriate resources,[127] Believes one has a hopeful path,[125] Effort justification,[144] Communication issues,[128] Effort justification,[145] Anecdotal fallacy,[146] Status quo bias,[148] Subjective validation,[147] Effort justification,[130] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[129] Trust,[131] Balanced workload pressure,[149] Anecdotal fallacy,[150] Forceful conflict about ideas,[151] Pessimism bias,[154] Anecdotal fallacy,[153] Cultural differences,[152] Pessimism bias,[132] Trust,[133] Balanced workload pressure,[134] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[156] Communicating ideas across domains,[157] Organizing effectively,[155] Trust,[136] Organizing effectively,[135] Trust,[137] Organizational encouragement

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