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Jetblue

J

Interviewee

9 Art Director

Team Disadvantages

0, 0

Project Outcome

Control

Industry

Transportation

Location

New York

Team Risk Tolerance

High

Team Dynamics

TeamDynamics_FunandProductive

Company

Jetblue


How, am I gonna take chances? We have a really good relationship, which is where I think really good work happens. Like, when they trust you, that's you know, I think as a person, we like each other. And it's just like common sense with dealing with people. You know, okay, you're my buddy, I'm gonna take your word for it. I trust you. And that's when you keep pushing, like, just believe us, it's gonna work, you know, and they let us do our job better. You know? [980],[979],[988]
And that's when, you know, the trust comes in, and like we talked about earlier, when it's talking about emotion versus pie charts, you know, they'll go out on a limb and they'll take a risk for you, and good stuff happens, normally. Hopefully. [989],[981]
Well, but they're better. Like, the guy who started it came from Southwest. But, everyone ... It has the most legroom. And everyone has leather chairs, and there's TVs in every seat, and there's unlimited snacks. You want another soda, have another soda. You want some more chips, have some chips. They have really good ... They treat their employees really well, there's no union. They just treat them well. It's like the only airline without a union, I think. [982]
So, there's like just this happiness thing going, and they did all this stuff, and now other, like Delta's coming in with changes, this changes, TVs in every ... Sorry ... Which they don't even do. They only do it on New York to San Francisco, or L.A. flights, and that's only on certain chairs. But it's like, people were trying to take credit for what we've been doing, and they're like, we're sick of this. We want people to know that this is us. So go out there and let them know that we're different, that we started this, and so, it was kind of a ballsy go for it type of thing. [984],[983]
Yeah, it's a lower budget. But a lot of times that's when the best creative happens, because there's like a saying, there's a book called The Houdini Effect. And it's the idea of like, when you have no constraints, oftentimes, I mean sometimes good stuff happens, but it's when you're in a box, and you have to figure out who to get out that the best creativity happens. [991],[990]
Yeah, it's a lower budget. But a lot of times that's when the best creative happens, because there's like a saying, there's a book called The Houdini Effect. And it's the idea of like, when you have no constraints, oftentimes, I mean sometimes good stuff happens, but it's when you're in a box, and you have to figure out who to get out that the best creativity happens. Because you have to work your way around it. You have to come up with a creative solution. [985]
Yeah, so it forces you to, okay, we can't go spend millions of dollars on one TV ad, so how can we reach these people, a targeted the right kind of people in different ways, so let's do nontraditional. Let's do this. And that's when all the good creative fun stuff comes. A lot of times having a low budget is good, I mean, you don't get to go do a TV spot all over the world. [986]
Okay. It's like, this is one of Ty's favorite clients, I think. Because when he first came here, it was the first one ... Like the first pitch they won. So, it was like, their baby. And they took it from some good agencies, so ... [987]
We had the initial concepting, big idea phase, which Grant and I worked on and busted our asses really tough, two months. And we sold off the idea. We sold it off to the client, but now we are working specifically on a TV campaign for that new brand idea. So that's the project. [1022]
Vague. [1023]
Vague, as in changing. [1036]
Vague, as in changing. There never was a specific brief in our hands for TV at any time. It was more like an ongoing process of just figuring it out. We've gone through many rounds, seeing what has worked, what hasn't. At one point it was like, "We need something big." What the fuck does that mean? [1025],[1024],[1026]
That could mean anything. I think that's ... I'm sure there's stuff going on above our heads, well I know there is, that we probably get little bits and pieces through trickling down. But I think that's a combination of up above us not being entirely sure of themselves. [1027],[1028]
The timing has been changed around, so it's erratic. Meaning like, "We need something two days from now. No, actually, we need it a week from now." So we have more time. "Wait, we actually need it two days from now." [1029]
Meaning like, "We need something two days from now. No, actually, we need it a week from now." So we have more time. "Wait, we actually need it two days from now." [1037]
Between myself and Grant? I think we've gotten pretty frustrated, at some point, on this TV ... probably frustrated with ourselves. A little bit with each other, but nothing bad. Probably because we haven't done as well with the TV as we would have liked. [1030]
Every team disagrees and argues, which is part of the creative process. I think arguing always makes the idea better, but probably a little more than normal. [1032],[1038],[1031]
Sure. But I mean, as far as getting to our larger relationship, it's still ... We're cool. So it's just little arguments here and there. [1033]
Nonexistent. [1034]
Account has been good. Our bosses, it's been good. They have a tendency, at times, to get stressed, which can trickle down. But aside from a few tight deadlines, pretty good [1035]
JetBlue, we're totally rebranding it. We're doing this totally new campaign. They're going with a concept, with our concept, so that's exciting, and like right now, I'm just now doing the look and feel, which is how changing [inaudible 00:57:03] is just me and one other dude doing that, so it's really cool, I got it in my hands. I feel like I really have ownership on it, you know what I mean, and it's a big thing. You don't get a rebrand every month. It's only every once in a while, because you rebrand, you come up with this big idea, and you just do executions according to that brand. It's like someone else's thought, someone else's line, I just have to come up with a clever execution to it. This, we created everything, and when it goes out, even though now more people are working on it, I feel like we've been on it from the start, and it's our idea, it's our tagline that's going. We made a book to help sell the idea. I think the book's actually getting made now. It's our, very popular. It's ours, so it's going through and that's exciting, so it's taking a while. It should hit in January or something, so we're just trying to get the TV, check it out. Yeah, so that's exciting. [973]
They have a whole board, just like any big company, in which you have to go through, this concept has been ... Presented it so many times, it's a crazy thing, because they're excited about it, so they've had them, the account people and the ECDs are bitching about having to present this and everything. Honestly, I think a thousand people have seen this. They had a 500 person presentation. They went and presented to all the vice presidents, they have like 32 vice presidents. They presented to all of them. They present to the head guy, they're trying to get this ingrained. It's like, we presented to all of these people. This is a weird case though, it doesn't normally go like this, but they're really excited about the idea, so they're getting everybody pumped about it. I can't even tell you how many people are involved on that side. The decision makers, I think it's just the board, I don't know, maybe 12 dudes, something like that. I honestly don't know, because again, it's a big rebrand. [974],[975]
I think they have a high risk tolerance. It's a higher one. I mean, the past campaign that we did with them, it was different. It was, they did this whole story booth thing where they had to go and create the story booth. That took a whole lot of money, and they had to make it from scratch. It's different from what they're used to, and they went out and did it. They're open to all these non-traditional ideas. Can I just do this really quick? Sorry. [977],[976],[978]
Reference Tags
[980] Risk compensation,[979] Trust,[988] Trust,[989] Trust,[981] Trust,[982] Illusory superiority,[984] Effort justification,[983] Illusory superiority,[991] Believes one has a hopeful path,[990] Believes one has high agency,[985] Believes one has a hopeful path,[986] Believes one has a hopeful path,[987] Ikea effect,[1022] Effort justification,[1023] Vague goals,[1036] Vague goals,[1025] Lack of real innovation mandate,[1024] Insufficient Feedback,[1026] Vague goals,[1027] Insufficient Feedback,[1028] Vague goals,[1029] Planning fallacy,[1037] Indecisive leadership,[1030] Resilience,[1032] Believes one has a hopeful path,[1038] Internal changes/challenges,[1031] Quick resolution of relationship conflict,[1033] Quick resolution of relationship conflict,[1034] Communication issues,[1035] Organizing effectively,[973] Ikea effect,[974] Indecisive leadership,[975] Insufficient Feedback,[977] Pro-innovation bias,[976] Risk compensation,[978] Trust

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