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Gyrus

G

Interviewee

40 Practice Person

Team Disadvantages

0, 2

Project Outcome

Successful

Industry

Medical

Location

Chicago

Team Risk Tolerance

High

Team Dynamics

TeamDynamics_FunandProductive

Company

Gyrus


I think the main reason it was most successful was because the client was either going to have a blockbuster product or go out of business, and so they were willing to take some huge risks, which a lot of our clients aren't willing to take. It was also just something where the skills of the team, the multidisciplinary nature of the team, really was essential to make it all work out. [2933]
I think the main reason it was most successful was because the client was either going to have a blockbuster product or go out of business, and so they were willing to take some huge risks, which a lot of our clients aren't willing to take. It was also just something where the skills of the team, the multidisciplinary nature of the team, really was essential to make it all work out [2932]
Well, we ended up going all the way through implementation, so I think in the end it ended up ... back then that was a lot, it was a 18 month, million plus program, but that was mostly because of the detail, the implementation stage, which we just don't do anymore on projects. [2934]
Probably three. The problem is it's like decision makers, there's a kind of ... the people that were in the respective disciplines were the decision makers on the ... Decision makers the wrong word I think, but I know what you're getting at. If you look at other places there's people feeling disempowered, but ... [2935]
I think the problem is that when you think about it, here it's like on a very multidisciplinary thing. You have to have a key decision maker for each discipline, so you've got to have a lead engineer who says, "There's no way we can make this." You have to have a lead human factors person who says, "These are the problems to solve." You have to have, in this one, a lead software engineer, and you had to have a lead ... well, the industrial design was ... so it's hard because one of the things is that ... I don't know, it's a rare situation here where the project leader just overrules the team and says, "No, I disagree." You know what I mean? [2936]
The idea inspiration ultimately was a moment in time when we saw a surgeon reaching for a tool. We saw his hand position, and we said, "That's what we want to design to." That was the ultimate inspiration for the hand piece shape. Then the other thing that was very unique about the design was that you could move the blade by just the fingertip control, and what made that happen was watching the cords get tangled with the old instrument as they had to move their hand like this. So the inspiration for it was the research, the design came directly from that. [2937]
They were very involved. They were very engineering centric and so there was a rapport there. It was a tiny little team on their side, and that was the difference too, it wasn't one of these things where we had these meetings with lots of people. I wouldn't say they function like a start-up, but it was a small core group that we worked very closely with. [2939]
People got along. People respected each other. People worked together. [2938]
Reference Tags
[2933] Organizing effectively,[2932] Risk compensation,[2934] Ikea effect,[2935] Lack of organizational encouragement,[2936] Dismissive,[2937] Ikea effect,[2939] Communicating ideas across domains,[2938] Organizing effectively

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MADISON BARNETT
I get my inspiration from the fictional world. I’m a social geek. Completely exploit 24/365 catalysts for change whereas high standards in action items. Conveniently whiteboard multifunctional benefits without enabled leadership.
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