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Generali

G

Interviewee

121 Engineer

Team Disadvantages

0, 3

Project Outcome

Successful

Industry

Insurance

Location

Shanghai

Team Risk Tolerance

Medium

Team Dynamics

TeamDynamics_FunandProductive

Company

Generali


What I worked on last, in London, actually was really interesting. Because whilst we were doing it, it felt like an uphill struggle, and that it wasn't clicking. Some of the team dynamics were difficult. The content area was really difficult. But we did, I think as a result, despite the clashes and the fact we were all so emotionally drained at the end of the 20 weeks, what we actually managed to deliver, kind of canceled out all the pain that the previous 20 weeks had been. Because we came out with some really cool solutions that were really well communicated and the kind of client really loved them. So I think that was quite interesting. What we came out with was really good, but getting there was very, very painful. [6092],[6090],[6091]
It's kind of, that one it was, it never felt like it was ever gonna come together. Or that the team was ever gonna agree on the same direction. A lot of the time we were arguing about the same thing, just in different languages. Which was quite interesting, because the team not only spoke different design thinking. So we had interaction designers, more visual designers, more human designers. And the fact we were all from different European countries, it was this kind of we were all trying to articulate the thing in the same way, but not using any of the same words, so we all think we're trying to disagree with each other. [6054],[6093]
So that team was also coaching the new wave of clients about IDEO's processes and how IDEO looks at innovation and some of the tools that these guys could use to become more innovative. But the thing that was really nice, is the client was really keen, so keen to be innovative. And the main key client that chose IDEO, was also really keen that we were creative and came up with new ways of doing things. [6055]
So that team was also coaching the new wave of clients about IDO's processes and how IDO looks at innovation and some of the tools that these guys could use to become more innovative. But the thing that was really nice, is the client was really keen, so keen to be innovative. And the main key client that chose IDO, was also really keen that we were creative and came up with new ways of doing things. [6094]
So when we get prototyping, financial services, they were like, 'Oh, lets try it.' They were also applying what we were teaching them to their day to day work. So we got them participating in brainstorms, and then asked them to actually run some brainstorms themselves. And they were like, 'Okay, cool. We can do this.' And then they were sending back brainstorm sketches of ideas because we were like, 'You shouldn't write down just what it is, you should try and illustrate it as well.' So they were emailing back pictures of Post-it notes that they had had from their brainstorms that were actual visuals. [6056]
were also applying what we were teaching them to their day to day work. So we got them participating in brainstorms, and then asked them to actually run some brainstorms themselves. And they were like, 'Okay, cool. We can do this.' And then they were sending back brainstorm sketches of ideas because we were like, 'You shouldn't write down just what it is, you should try and illustrate it as well.' So they were emailing back pictures of Post-it notes that they had had from their brainstorms that were actual visuals. [6096],[6097],[6095],[6098]
So it was quite, but I think if that was kind of, because it was such a large core team, as well as having that one team that could help the client navigate what we're taking them through, it allowed us to work a lot smarter. And the nice thing was, cause we had two simultaneous projects, we managed to keep the deliverable that we gave them at the end, match it to their expect... Between the two teams, so the two IDEO teams delivered two very similar ways of presenting the works, even though we might not have actually coordinated deliverables across those two projects. [6059]
So it was really interesting that they were so keen, and they were kind of being given the permission to take these tools that we were teaching them and apply them to other things that they would then come into meeting going, "Yeah, look at this. The idea for my other project. Look at this." [6058]
So it was really interesting that they were so keen, and they were kind of being given the permission to take these tools that we were teaching them and apply them to other things that they would then come into meeting going, "Yeah, look at this. The idea for my other project. Look at this." So it was quite, but I think if that was kind of, because it was such a large core team, as well as having that one team that could help the client navigate what we're taking them through, it allowed us to work a lot smarter. And the nice thing was, cause we had two simultaneous projects, we managed to keep the deliverable that we gave them at the end, match it to their expect... Between the two teams, so the two IDEO teams delivered two very similar ways of presenting the works, even though we might not have actually coordinated deliverables across those two projects. [6057]
So it was really interesting that they were so keen, and they were kind of being given the permission to take these tools that we were teaching them and apply them to other things that they would then come into meeting going, "Yeah, look at this. The idea for my other project. Look at this." So it was quite, but I think if that was kind of, because it was such a large core team, as well as having that one team that could help the client navigate what we're taking them through, it allowed us to work a lot smarter. And the nice thing was, cause we had two simultaneous projects, we managed to keep the deliverable that we gave them at the end, match it to their expect... Between the two teams, so the two IDO teams delivered two very similar ways of presenting the works, even though we might not have actually coordinated deliverables across those two projects. [6099]
Three different teams that were three to four, full time. There were, then each of those teams really had another business factors' person that was pretty part-time. Mainly because the budgets wouldn't actually allow for business factors to be on full-time. And then other people, as and when we needed them. So we might pull in another extra couple of communication designers towards the end, to help communicate things. And actually towards the end-end, we also had directors that were creating videos for us. [6060]
We had script writers writing copy for us, and writing scripts. So we kind of, towards the end we pulled in a lot more people to actually help us create the final thing. We had photographers and it became much more of a production thing than normal projects are, because we were trying to keep the same level. But also create deliverables the client could present, that didn't matter how they were presented, same details. Cause it was almost like clicking play on a video and everything communicated itself. [6061]
And the interesting thing was we came up with two big ideas, and of these two one liked one and one liked the other. And actually in the final presentation, they were both standing up to each other about their favorite idea. [6063]
So we continually, and also because they are Italian, by nature we had this whole thing where we had to get the project managers to say yes. And the core team to say yes. Kirsten also had to say yes. And then we also had to get the buy-in for at least one of those two. And the interesting thing was we came up with two big ideas, and of these two one liked one and one liked the other. And actually in the final presentation, they were both standing up to each other about their favorite idea. [6062]
Again, at times it felt like there were too many. I'm trying to think. There was the project manager, and the core team. There were, so there were three, four of us on our team. But then we had weekly reviews with practice leadership. So they had opinion. So it was quite strange from that point of view actually. Looking, now you can ask that question because at the time it felt it was really, I think that was one of the things that was really hard. Because no one really felt that they were the key decision maker. Even the project manager still felt like he had to get the practice leadership to agree with our thinking. So as a team, also seeing that we had some role in helping work out what was the right decision, but then no one quite knowing what was the right decision. [6065],[6064]
Because no one really felt that they were the key decision maker. Even the project manager still felt like he had to get the practice leadership to agree with our thinking. So as a team, also seeing that we had some role in helping work out what was the right decision, but then no one quite knowing what was the right decision. PROJECT ID [6100],[6101]
Everyone's opinions always gathered and then it was almost, kind of, do decision by committee. [6102]
I think that's the one thing, cause with our team structure is, even if you have a project manager who's the overall decision maker, it's the guys who are actually doing the work, when you've only got a core team of three or four people, those people have... I think the project manager tried really hard to make those people feel like they were also involved in decision making process. [6068],[6069]
I think that's the one thing, cause with our team structure is, even if you have a project manager who's the overall decision maker, it's the guys who are actually doing the work, when you've only got a core team of three or four people, those people have... I think the project manager tried really hard to make those people feel like they were also involved in decision making process. So, cause we're trying to work out what's right for the client rather than what's right for us. Everyone's opinions always gathered and then it was almost, kind of, do decision by committee. [6066]
So, cause we're trying to work out what's right for the client rather than what's right for us. Everyone's opinions always gathered and then it was almost, kind of, do decision by committee. [6067]
But I think, again, those five or six decision makers were also trying to always make decisions collaboratively. But not necessarily always having the same amounts of time, at the same time. So everyone was always like, "Oh I just had this new piece of information that I think it will impact this." So there were lots of different decisions that were being made. [6070]
So I was making some decisions about the research and, but those decisions were key on some of the stuff that was happening with the project manager that, and the clients project manager, the internal project manager. And the things were happening with, at this level, with practice leadership was communicating with these guys and trying to. So there were lots, whilst they were kind of, cause they were different levels. There were different people that were trying to get decisions, and making decisions, and then you were trying to then get those all in alignment to the same decision. [6071]
The interesting thing was because this was so future looking, it almost felt a bit like they were, whilst they were really keen and they were like, 'Yeah, we could be creative. We can do all these different things.' Whether or not they would have actually been able to implement anything, that level of decision making and risk taking wasn't clear. So you never actually quite understood whether or not they would. Whilst they were talking the talk as if they had a very low risk tolerance, I don't think they were. [6072]
But I think that's the problem of trying to innovate within financial services, is to be innovative, you have to forget all the rules on how business is done as normal. Kind of, what is the legal way things have to be done? And you should almost push that all to the side, come up with some innovative solutions and then try and map back on what legislation says you can and can't do. [6073],[6074],[6103]
What physically is possible in terms of, we had some cool ideas about breaking insurance down, so you're insuring just one event. So it's a very small insurance package. And they were like, 'Oh, great, great.' But you still kind of knew that they weren't actually convinced that it would physically be possible. [6075]
But I think that was mainly not because they wanted to be. It was the fact the industry they worked in almost limited them to that. [6076]
We did some testing with consumers. But we were above the level of actually going to implement things. This was very much looking for strategic opportunities. Cause a lot of our ideas meant starting a new business. Like starting a bank. They were that scale of innovation. [6077]
Yeah. It was, we did some kind of initial, for in the water type testing. But what I think's actually happening at the moment essentially is, we're talking to them about trying to actually look at prototyping some of these ideas, and actually on a high level. So actually faking some of the interactions or actually creating a kind of, simulating it through what they already have. Or creating actually a real working prototype and actually trialing it in a small market. [6104]
I think they wanted to focus on building existing relationships, leveraging existing customers, and eCommerce. And we were like, "That's quite limiting in terms of innovation." So those originally were two separate projects they wanted to run. We combined them and said, "Let's look at youth." Because youth actually have, their parents tend to be the ones involved with financial services. [6105]
So it was, we abstracted it into two, the youth and the migrant's opportunity areas. And then the actual specific scope of the projects, we defined by running a collaborative workshop with the 25 stakeholders, where we discussed what we could do with the project. And then got them to discuss their thinking and try to, collaboratively, with 25 people and I think it was like six of us, seven of us, what the project was gonna be about. Which I don't think I would ever do again. I would try and do it with a small core team of people. Or be a lot, have a stronger opinion of what we wanted the project to be about before we started. But it was kind of starting from scratch were there's not, with a buy-in group of 25 people, that wanted to actually feel like they'd made the decision. [6078],[6079]
Well I think that was the nice thing about them as a client was that they were open to us saying, 'We don't think this is gonna give you what you want out of it.' [6107],[6081],[6106],[6080]
And we did a workshop with them, or with some of them, to actually explore some of these areas before the actual kick off. So I don't know exactly what happened in that, but I think that was more, again, of a information sharing. To work out some wider possibilities that youth and the nomads were the ones that they wanted to focus on. [6109],[6108]
So that all happened with the practice leadership before I joined. In terms of redefining actually the opportunity areas. And we did a workshop with them, or with some of them, to actually explore some of these areas before the actual kick off. So I don't know exactly what happened in that, but I think that was more, again, of a information sharing. To work out some wider possibilities that youth and the nomads were the ones that they wanted to focus on. [6082]
No. And actually the one nice thing was, time wise, we'd actually scoped it so it was realistic. Because we knew that we'd had this 25 people that we needed to get buy-in from the whole time, an extra couple of weeks had been added to each of the phases, to get that buy-in. [6083]
And actually budget was quite flexible, which I think was key to the fogginess of the project. [6085]
Some of the opportunity areas or opportunity backers. So we're seeing ideas come into. Like in our actually research, we didn't look at rewards schemes, but we suddenly realize that to actually engage with youth we're gonna need to come up with some ideas that do reward people. [6110]
Which was quite nice. So we had a bit more time than, it wasn't as tight as a lot of projects I've worked on. [6084]
So we just organized a focus group with a group of young people and a group of parents on the kind of rewards schemes, what are the benefits? What are good reward schemes? What are bad reward schemes? To just kind of help give us some better ideas. And we actually did some kind of getting consumers to help us brainstorm and built on some of the initial ideas we had. [6111]
And I think that was nice when the budget isn't tight you can just go, "Let's do that today. Or should we do that on Thursday? We can't make a decision about which of these is right, lets get some other people, experts in and get them to help us do things." So from that point of view, I think, but also I think the project manager was really good at making sure the budget side of things, we didn't really. It's like, "Yeah, no, we've got the funds for that. Just don't work for more than 40 hours this week." [6087],[6086]
I don't know. I think it was interesting because we had such big business factors input, but it was really guided by not only what we heard, it was mostly pay-in to consumers about, cause it was what was really desirable to consumers. But also what worked, what were the biggest opportunities for them as the client. So financially, what were the biggest rewards for them. So what was gonna be, but also what was easiest for them to implement. Although we did, I suppose, the feasibility was the thing that was given the least consideration. It was mainly what was desirable and what was viable. So there were quite a few ideas that were sort of a bit desirable, where we had to work out how to make them viable. [6088]
I'm not sure we can. So if it didn't make money it was like, 'We've gotta find a way of making it money. We've gotta creatively come up with.' And I think that's the one thing that's always very difficult, is when you bring in the guys that actually help with that, in terms of working out if things are, how to make things viable. [6089]
Reference Tags
[6092] Believes one has a hopeful path,[6090] Believes one has high agency,[6091] Peak-end rule,[6054] Forceful conflict about ideas,[6093] Language barrier,[6055] Pro-innovation bias,[6094] Methodologically creative,[6056] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[6096] Believes one has high agency,[6097] Collaborative-Creative Disposition,[6095] Communicating ideas across domains,[6098] Creative Confidence,[6059] Organizing effectively,[6058] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[6057] Pro-innovation bias,[6099] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[6060] Appropriate resources,[6061] Appropriate resources,[6063] Forceful conflict about ideas,[6062] Indecisive leadership,[6065] Indecisive leadership,[6064] Vague roles,[6100] Indecisive leadership,[6101] Vague roles,[6102] Indecisive leadership,[6068] Decisive leadership,[6069] Organizational encouragement,[6066] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[6067] Indecisive leadership,[6070] Indecisive leadership,[6071] Indecisive leadership,[6072] Lack of real innovation mandate,[6073] Lack of real innovation mandate,[6074] Law of the instrument,[6103] Methodologically creative,[6075] Insufficient Feedback,[6076] Empathetic disposition,[6077] Lack of real innovation mandate,[6104] Methodologically creative,[6105] Empathetic disposition,[6078] Communication issues,[6079] Confirmation bias,[6107] Communicating ideas across domains,[6081] Great example - Received feedback, actively engage with it,[6106] Trust,[6080] Win-win conflict about ideas,[6109] Communicating ideas across domains,[6108] Organizing effectively,[6082] Win-win conflict about ideas,[6083] Planning fallacy,[6085] Appropriate resources,[6110] Empathetic disposition,[6084] Balanced workload pressure,[6111] Empathetic disposition,[6087] Appropriate resources,[6086] Balanced workload pressure,[6088] Win-win conflict about ideas,[6089] Win-win conflict about ideas

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MADISON BARNETT
I get my inspiration from the fictional world. I’m a social geek. Completely exploit 24/365 catalysts for change whereas high standards in action items. Conveniently whiteboard multifunctional benefits without enabled leadership.
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