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Ford

F

Interviewee

25 Designer

Team Disadvantages

Project Outcome

Successful

Industry

Transportation

Location

Chicago

Team Risk Tolerance

High

Team Dynamics

TeamDynamics_FunandProductive

Company

Ford


Hal was, and those were very good, not because again, the content but because we pushed the envelope in terms of the deliverable and explaining our client, what we're able to do. Both of them ended up with very, very impressive experiences, prototypes, let's call them a word that we want, but something that spoke the language of our client, used to see like one scale claim models of cars and sit inside ... not working cars and looking at the nitty gritty details of the curves and streamline. [1809]
It was like a big interaction design effort in trying to show, okay, this beside what you're going to [inaudible 00:28:41], is going to be how your information is accessed, flows and is displayed inside your car from the driving information, to the meeting information, to the diagnostics stuff. [1843]
Our project was very much focused on providing a platform for the information architecture and information flowing inside the car for the entire fleet [1844]
but the interesting thing is like how we were able to put together a team and get the teams so engaged and so excited to push the envelope to probably places where they didn't have precedence in the company [1812]
Something I see it happen, more and more rarely. [1845]
The project itself, yeah was fascinating, I mean fascinating because that's what I like, it's very much focused on the, my strengths [1810]
The project itself, yeah was fascinating, I mean fascinating because that's what I like, it's very much focused on the, my strengths, but the interesting thing is like how we were able to put together a team and get the teams so engaged and so excited to push the envelope to probably places where they didn't have precedence in the company. [1847],[1848],[1846],[1849],[1850]
The project itself, yeah was fascinating, I mean fascinating because that's what I like, it's very much focused on the, my strengths, but the interesting thing is like how we were able to put together a team and get the teams so engaged and so excited to push the envelope to probably places where they didn't have precedence in the company. That's what I think, [inaudible 00:29:30] currently is missing, that's the reason I was saying, it's good and bad because to innovate and to be cutting edge, you need very much special occasions and company should nurture more, those kinds of situations, those kinds of occasions. Something I see it happen, more and more rarely. [1811]
40 hours a week or 50 hours a week, there's working 80 hours a week, for three, four weeks. [1858]
Here we're talking about the fact that, we're making money anyway, but instead of doing a certain margin, we do another one and maybe we're losing money because people are working instead of ... 40 hours a week or 50 hours a week, there's working 80 hours a week, for three, four weeks. Those people are not forced to be there, and the fact they are there I think it's amazing, yeah because there's the only drive, it's like the passion they have for what they're doing. [1854],[1852],[1853],[1855]
hose people are not forced to be there, and the fact they are there I think it's amazing, yeah because there's the only drive, it's like the passion they have for what they're doing. That's the reason why I think, I'm not sure if these things are healthy for a business [inaudible 00:31:54], are definitely healthy for creativity, are definitely healthy for the people that are really passionate about what they do. [1851]
Those people are not forced to be there, and the fact they are there I think it's amazing, yeah because there's the only drive, it's like the passion they have for what they're doing. That's the reason why I think, I'm not sure if these things are healthy for a business [inaudible 00:31:54], are definitely healthy for creativity, are definitely healthy for the people that are really passionate about what they do. [1856],[1857]
They're like a very intense and passionate project, just having a little calmer, or I don't know, I don't have the [1862],[1861]
We have vision on that, but nurturing creativity, nurturing innovation needs as well, have to go back to what we were saying before are very, very big tools of passion and common vision and common goals. [1860],[1859]
think the big success was creating an environment that seemed like, you know the expression, skunk works, so it's like a very, very specialized team that is almost like the SWAT team. It gets the job done in and extreme focus and extreme passion fun. [1863]
I think the big success was creating an environment that seemed like, you know the expression, skunk works, so it's like a very, very specialized team that is almost like the SWAT team. It gets the job done in and extreme focus and extreme passion fun. [1867],[1865],[1869],[1864],[1868],[1871],[1870],[1866]
It's easy to put everything together, especially for I think ... I think the key is [inaudible 00:32:50] identity, what ideal wants to be and wants to do in the future. It's either about being cutting edge or is it about being a good innovator that provide very equipped services for some specific clients. If it helps or it creates a good picture. The cool thing of this project, I think the big success was creating an environment that seemed like, you know the expression, skunk works, so it's like a very, very specialized team that is almost like the SWAT team. It gets the job done in and extreme focus and extreme passion fun. [1814],[1813]
I mean, we're people, like here at night, like having fun and it's not like, "Oh! My god! We're late, we have to do ..." no, it's like, there was like a room full of nine people, working every day until two in the morning, no problem, like fun. Going back home tired, exhausted, yes, but eager to come back in the morning after a good rest, so that I think was successful. [1875],[1878],[1877],[1872],[1815],[1876],[1873],[1874]
I mean, the truth is that, we're all talented people, we're all very good professionals, we know what we're doing, so from that point of view risking [inaudible 00:34:36] is pretty easy. It's very rare to scrub with a project. [1883],[1881],[1882]
Successful was the people, the team, the environment created and the project comes by itself [1880],[1879]
Successful was the people, the team, the environment created and the project comes by itself. [1817]
Successful was the people, the team, the environment created and the project comes by itself. I mean, the truth is that, we're all talented people, we're all very good professionals, we know what we're doing, so from that point of view risking [inaudible 00:34:36] is pretty easy. It's very rare to scrub with a project. [1816]
We were not on top of that, [inaudible 00:36:43] is not in the best situation, financial situation ever. We had the occasion where we started working with someone that at the end of the project wasn't there, because of all the layoffs that were running, so pretty big. [1884],[1818]
Right, ell, this brings up I think an interesting look or perspective into projects. There're projects that are purely focused on innovation and making something change. It makes some change and that most likely are the ones that have the higher [inaudible 00:39:28] involved. The ones that make innovation, but most likely make some executives or make some [inaudible 00:39:42], so the purpose of the project is to fault. There is actually, it could be ... maybe it does more but I can say, one is nobody is going to make any other decision, you're going forward, this is the project, we trust you guys, do it and we're going to put all the resources in places to make it happen from the clients side, or there's a project manager or someone that has enough power to collect three, four hundred thousand dollars, that see's IDEO as a very interesting way to introduce fresh air in their team. [1822],[1820],[1819],[1821]
The ones that make innovation, but most likely make some executives or make some [inaudible 00:39:42], so the purpose of the project is to fault. [1885],[1886]
There're projects that are purely focused on innovation and making something change. [1887]
[inaudible 00:40:22] have to then basically respond to higher Ops and they're very, very nervous because, somehow their career is in place obviously, spending that amount of money in consultancy, quite often is risky. There very, very nervous, but I would say, 80 to 90% of the time, they get a promotion so, that's what happens and most likely that leads in to another project or into something new, something ... That's a good way as well to develop a relationship. [1823],[1824]
have to then basically respond to higher Ops and they're very, very nervous because, somehow their career is in place obviously, spending that amount of money in consultancy, quite often is risky. [1888]
The higher Ops don't have a problem, they try and if they see value, just like, go for it. [1890]
The latter is a little bit more difficult, because it's high stress, because the person that is looking for a promotion is really very much aware of the fact that it cannot screw up, so it's very nervous for every step. [1889]
The latter is a little bit more difficult, because it's high stress, because the person that is looking for a promotion is really very much aware of the fact that it cannot screw up, so it's very nervous for every step. The higher Ops don't have a problem, they try and if they see value, just like, go for it. [1825]
No, I think it wasn't [inaudible 00:43:33], the project was good, I think it created a little bit of, to what we were discussing [inaudible 00:43:41], little bit of frustration knowing that it's a very much a unique occasion and it cannot happen very often. [1826],[1827]
Extremely enthusiastic. [1892],[1891],[1893]
Yeah, we get briefs and generally, we say, "No, you're wrong, you really mean this." [1828]
The following phase was making up, so it was a walk-in prototype with different permutations. We went through evaluation, we had several ideas, we had people coming in doing tests. We got ... it was like a long process but overall, witnessed by the client, approved by the client, owned by the client, so all the decisions that were made, were not surprise at the end. [1829]
Users. [1894]
Yeah, we talk to people and we have two different way of doing things. We have a very much focused interview or either things that what we're call, extreme users or [inaudible 00:46:46]. Where you don't really look into the act of driving or the act of interacting with the tangible user interface or graphical user interface, with your car, but they have an [inaudible 00:47:01] way to dealing with it. I don't know. [1830],[1895]
We went to see the interiors of our corporate jet and see how it was all laid out, so high complexity, high efficiency controls. We met with people that would more defied our cause and put like PlayStation and screens and other things in the car. That's why we'd like to talk to normal people with some specific need especially with, and we were focusing on specific type of car, more SUV and things like that. [1896]
The opinion is, we all have very much different backgrounds and influences, or what influences someone's work and that quite often goes up in to that place that we informally call the parking lot, that are basically all the unstructured ideas, that as a designer I know they're going to come back on brainstorm, so why are we waiting for the people to tell us that what they want and then brainstorm around those and go back to the parking lot ideas, that we generated without the process. It's a good way to let ideas out and focus on something else and focusing on the story, so [inaudible 00:49:03]. [1831]
Yeah, focus on the other parts or the parts on how to tell a story, the part, you know because honestly from a process point of view, it's easier to go to the client and say, "Hey, this is what people told us and this is what it means and this is what we're going to do." Rather than say, "Hey, here's a beautiful idea," and the client says, "Yeah, but where does it come from, what's the foundation for it." [1832]
Yeah, focus on the other parts or the parts on how to tell a story, the part, you know because honestly from a process point of view, it's easier to go to the client and say, "Hey, this is what people told us and this is what it means and this si what we're going to do." Rather than say, "Hey, here's a beautiful idea," and the client says, "Yeah, but where does it come from, what's the foundation for it." PROJECT ID [1897]
I mean ... that's the point, I think we go through different levels and going from paper to electronics is a good way for us to do. An idea is a [inaudible 00:50:05], right, an idea can be a [inaudible 00:50:09]. An idea could be like a quick simulation of a picture with Photoshop on screen or an interactive one, so ideally, it works like this, it's this is quantity, and this is quality, so you start with a lot and build while you go up. In terms of the final deliverable, it's more and more refined. [1898]
Right, and this filter is iteration and showing to the users, is talking to our client. Our client says, "NO, no, no, this idea we cannot really do because our other team is doing it," and you know, it goes, even if it's the best idea on the project. [1833]
Yeah, I mean, right but the user is always the best way to tell the story, that's the reason why we always have test or what we call evaluation in between what [inaudible 00:51:43] we show progressively ideas back to the users and we get a gut feeling. We show down, we get a feedback and say, "Okay, we could take it to [inaudible 00:51:53]." We show it again and we get another feedback and you know and this whole action is incremental until where I say, "Okay, we have enough good picture that we can say this is it, or these are it." [1835],[1900],[1834],[1899]
I think that day-to-day interaction with team members was a little bit more difficult, but that's something that generally happens, because we know that we have to build ownership. We have to have people believing on what they're doing, what we're doing. [1836]
I think the biggest satisfaction is when the clients start using your own words, it's starting like a repeating like a parrot. It's awesome because you know, that means that it's there, you don't have to [crosstalk 00:53:01]- [1837]
Again, you can have the best idea ever, but if you're not able to take it until the end of the journey, it's not going to fly. [1839]
all about the relationship and all about how to make sure that message go through [1840]
That's to me for example [inaudible 00:54:26], one of the most exciting part, all about the relationship and all about how to make sure that message go through. Again, you can have the best idea ever, but if you're not able to take it until the end of the journey, it's not going to fly. [1838]
Well, again, it depends, I think especially it depends on the context, like [inaudible 00:55:02] context, or in creative context, it's [inaudible 00:55:10] easier, because there's a lot of energy and passion but the aspect of ownership has a lot to be more rational. From a logistic and more business side, I think that is only to experience, so I think that if you're uncomfortable with the situation, because the client is not happy, [inaudible 00:55:41], because they're complaining about the cost because, and I'm giving examples though it wasn't the case in this project [inaudible 00:55:52]. [1841]
ask for help for somebody who is more senior for mitigation, yeah. PROJECT ID [1901]
From that point of view, I think it's pretty transparent if you have some problems or internal, or conflicts with the client, ask for help for somebody who is more senior for mitigation, yeah. [1842]
Reference Tags
[1809] pro-innovation bias,[1843] Communicating ideas across domains,[1844] Believes one has a hopeful path,[1812] Organizing effectively,[1845] Rosy retrospection,[1810] Effort justification,[1847] Appropriate resources,[1848] Balance of challenging work,[1846] Organizing effectively,[1849] Win-win conflict about ideas,[1850] Win-win conflict about relationships,[1811] pro-innovation bias,[1858] Balanced workload pressure,[1854] Believes one has a hopeful path,[1852] Optimism,[1853] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[1855] Resilience,[1851] Subjective validation,[1856] In-group bias,[1857] Planning fallacy,[1862] Balance of challenging work,[1861] Balanced workload pressure,[1860] Organizational encouragement,[1859] Organizing effectively,[1863] In-group bias,[1867] Appropriate resources,[1865] Believes one has a hopeful path,[1869] Believes one has high agency,[1864] Collaborative-Creative Disposition,[1868] Creative Confidence,[1871] Decisive leadership,[1870] Organizing effectively,[1866] Resilience,[1814] Organizing effectively,[1813] pro-innovation bias,[1875] Balance of challenging work,[1878] Believes one has a hopeful path,[1877] Believes one has high agency,[1872] Effort justification,[1815] Great example - Team Dynamics,[1876] In-group bias,[1873] Optimism,[1874] Resilience,[1883] Better than average,[1881] In-group bias,[1882] Overconfidence bias,[1880] Organizational encouragement,[1879] Organizing effectively,[1817] Appropriate resources,[1816] Organizing effectively,[1884] Internal changes/challenges,[1818] Lack of resources,[1822] Decisive leadership,[1820] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[1819] Trust,[1821] Trust,[1885] Lack of real innovation mandate,[1886] Selfish motivation for the project,[1887] Pro-innovation bias,[1823] Risk compensation,[1824] Trust,[1888] Selfish motivation for the project,[1890] Ostrich effect,[1889] Selfish motivation for the project,[1825] Selfish motivation for the project,[1826] Halo effect,[1827] Rosy retrospection,[1892] Believes one has a hopeful path,[1891] Believes one has high agency,[1893] Optimism,[1828] Illusory superiority,[1829] Communicating ideas across domains,[1894] Listening disposition,[1830] Empathetic disposition,[1895] Listening disposition,[1896] Listening disposition,[1831] Listening disposition,[1832] Listening disposition,[1897] Methodologically creative,[1898] Methodologically creative,[1833] Finding existing ideas,[1835] Confirmation bias,[1900] Empathetic disposition,[1834] Listening disposition,[1899] Listening disposition,[1836] Empathetic disposition,[1837] Confirmation bias,[1839] Resilience,[1840] Win-win conflict about ideas,[1838] Believes one has a hopeful path,[1841] Yielding conflict about ideas,[1901] Authority bias,[1842] Organizational encouragement

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MADISON BARNETT
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