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Feed Me Bottles

F

Interviewee

186 Designer

Team Disadvantages

1, 3

Project Outcome

Successful

Industry

Health/wellness

Location

London

Team Risk Tolerance

High

Team Dynamics

TeamDynamics_FunandProductive

Company

Feed Me Bottles


, Feed Me Bottles, I think you spoke to Lucy, as well. Yeah, that went well enough for multiple reasons. On a person thing, I'm very much of instant gratification. And this was a six weeks project, and it was full paced, like we couldn't have worked any quicker, we didn't work stupid hours or stuff, we'd go home around sort of half six every night, but in those hours, everything was condensed. It was like two weeks observation, two weeks ideas, two weeks execution. [8719]
And this was a six weeks project, and it was full paced, like we couldn't have worked any quicker, we didn't work stupid hours or stuff, we'd go home around sort of half six every night, but in those hours, everything was condensed. It was like two weeks observation, two weeks ideas, two weeks execution. [8717]
And it was sort of bang, bang, bang done. And it was an interesting project because it's so short that everything has to run alongside each other, so you've got the human factors with the branding, with the sort of communication of it, we even went down to sort of adverts and suggestions for advertising. And the business plan, as well. We had a business factor working with us, so because of that, everything was working sort of empowered with each other, and that sort of put a thread throughout it all and tied it all in. [8756],[8745]
everything was working sort of empowered with each other, and that sort of put a thread throughout it all and tied it all in. [8755]
And we think it came out really nicely executed at the end. For me, that was a great project, because we had an awesome deliverable at the end. If you ... Quite often you see projects where ... I mean, not so much IDEO, but quite often you can see things where they're sort of mix-matched and the product's been designed, then the brand's been designed, and something else has been sort of ... That just has to keep the same logo, or they've got some brand values that tie in together roughly, where this was just really different, the fact that everything usually and in any company, you'd have a brand and then you'd design a new product, but the fact that the company was being ... The brand of the company was being built alongside the product means that everything reinforces each other, which is nice. [8725],[8715]
The brand of the company was being built alongside the product means that everything reinforces each other, which is nice. [8757]
In terms of what was interesting about it, I don't know if you ... We took a seven percent share in that company in exchange, obviously. So that was interesting, the fact that we were almost ... To a degree, we were the client, as well. So, because we own seven percent of the company, so it went really well. And I was dubious at first as to how that was gonna work, whether we would try and override, because quite often if you get a tricky client, and you sort of have to work out with them, I didn't know if we would be sort of trying to override those with us owning seven percent, or just how mentally you'd get your brain around the idea that if I liked this, and the client didn't, then how ... What would we pursue, then? [8716]
But it worked really well, it was just things though, the client and naturally we designed to the best of our ability, so it was irrelevant as to whether we liked it, they liked it, we were always both gonna like it. So, yes, so that was interesting. And the sort of, say, merging everything together, of never sort of really heard of the product. I mean [inaudible 00:09:36]. But I've never heard of a project where everything sort of been designed from scratch. Even down to the final thing we passed over last week was the director's business cards and stuff that we designed, so it was like stationary, even throwing in at the end. [8758],[8759],[8726],[8742]
There's been a shift, sort of more recently, to sort of make things a lot more tangible. Like you'll see a lot of projects print posters rather than do projected presentations, and just makes things tangible, get things on the table, and this was interesting, because in London, we don't really design stuff ... We're not known for a huge amount of project design like Munich and Palo Alto sort of do that, and we do product design comes into occasionally, but it's more in terms of deliverables. [8728]
Because this was a staff project, so we had like models made and we had foam models and then we had aesthetic models done, from prototypers, and that was really interesting, just seeing people get really revved up and excited about it. Like Suzie was on the project, she's been here for sort of ... 20 years, or something like that. A long, long time. And she's sort of an engineer by training, and she was saying, that it was great to see people's faces like they used to when stuff would come into the office and people would wow, look at this, look at this. [8729]
Because usually we have like a folder or a poster or something like that, sort of stuff. So sort of stuff's changed. So that was really interesting, really tangible product, in terms of human factor side of it as well. Bringing in the users, that was interesting, because we had foam, so each bottle we designed, we had a foam mock-up made and the users could try that, and it was interesting seeing the different, in terms of users holding a bottle and using a sort of testing, imaging it with a foam bottle, as opposed to looking at a poster, being like, yeah, I like that, it's all right. No, I wouldn't buy that one, it's yellow or something like that. [8730]
Bringing in the users, that was interesting, because we had foam, so each bottle we designed, we had a foam mock-up made and the users could try that, and it was interesting seeing the different, in terms of users holding a bottle and using a sort of testing, imaging it with a foam bottle, as opposed to looking at a poster, being like, yeah, I like that, it's all right. No, I wouldn't buy that one, it's yellow or something like that. [8760]
So the difference in terms of opinion by the tangible, in terms of the procedure was quite interesting. [8761]
it wasn't a women's institute conference, every afternoon discussing what we should do. [8718]
There's probably rarely more than three or four people full-time. Which is also a great thing as well, because it was just really easy to make decisions, it wasn't a women's institute conference, every afternoon discussing what we should do. [8722],[8746]
I think because we just had to trust each other and sort of trust their views and opinions. [8762]
It was like, should we do this? Yeah, okay, let's do that. So, if the team was any bigger, we'd have struggled to get the project done in such a small amount of time. [8766],[8764],[8765],[8763]
It was like, should we do this? Yeah, okay, let's do that. So, if the team was any bigger, we'd have struggled to get the project done in such a small amount of time. I think because we just had to trust each other and sort of trust their views and opinions. [8751]
So, if the team was any bigger, we'd have struggled to get the project done in such a small amount of time. I think because we just had to trust each other and sort of trust their views and opinions. [8733]
But in terms of the sort of actual tangible, when you give it to them in a magazine, so like the final ad sets we put in a magazine, then the context has changed, they're no longer focused on this one A3 sheet on the wall that we're gonna make them look at and talk about. [8767]
They all sort of picked up this bottle, and then sort of imagined their kid was there, and were like, yeah, that feels awkward, that feels a bit too heavy, and stuff. [8768]
We went out initially, researched shops to understand the market. It was slightly different in this case. I don't know if it's the best example, if you're looking for idea generation tips because we were approached with a specific idea and asked to build on it [8411]
And they all like voted, oh, we love that, we love that, we love that. And then we sort of passed the bottle around, and they had it in this thing, it was like huge, because on the image it looked fine, then when they held it, and then they sort of sleek design that we had going on, then suddenly, and you sort of had your bottle cap coming out of here, suddenly when they held this, and they'd sort of taken the cap off and they'd held it, they were like, oh, it feels like it's slipping out of my hand. [8769]
So the perception was all like, oh, that is beautiful, and sleek, and then they hold it, and the practicality's over, this feels like it would slip out of my hand. [8770]
And then, instead of doing more in home interviews, we then asked the users to come in to workshops that were kind of in the project, like those two milestones. And we basically, they were like co-creation sessions and with the users, [8412]
And at that second one here, we showed them four different options in terms of design, building on what they told us in the first one and we deliberately had the same people come back in so that there was a continuity there. They could see the development. And then we just got their opinion on the positives and negatives of each one we showed them. And then we kind of took that [inaudible 00:17:30] that information down to get to the direction we actually end up in the end. Of course, with I suppose the outside ... if this is all user stuff, we also ... coming into it, we had other inspirations outside of just talking to the consumers like, what's good out there at the moment in that marketspace, but also in other marketspaces, so you don't have to just look in the marketspace you are actually designing for. You can get inspiration from other ones just as easily. [8379],[8395]
They could see the development. And then we just got their opinion on the positives and negatives of each one we showed them. And then we kind of took that [inaudible 00:17:30] that information down to get to the direction we actually end up in the end. [8413]
But in terms of different projects, I think it's certainly very talked about, because it's a totally different way of doing things, like, we're taking equity instead of money, which is obviously one of the key things. But also, we're designing a company, sort of semi from scratch. I mean, they came to us with the technology, but we've done the brand, and so our deliverable was their pitch to sort of the John Lewises and all this stuff, rather than usually we do a presentation saying, this is what we did, and this is how we got there. Instead it was like, this is what Feed Me is, and it was a totally sort of modular pitch that we give to them. [8727]
So, in terms of its scale and size, money-wise it's quite hard to value. But in terms of different projects, I think it's certainly very talked about, because it's a totally different way of doing things, like, we're taking equity instead of money, which is obviously one of the key things. But also, we're designing a company, sort of semi from scratch. [8771]
And that's something, historically, we haven't really done, because you get so in depth, you're like living in your space with your team. You kind of live that product or whatever you're designing for that many weeks. [8414]
I suppose one thing we do here, typically anyway, is the core team focused on one project at a time, so in this case, there was a few part-time team members, but their job was more going around working on multiple projects and reviewing and adding in. The core team were focusing on the one project, so you can get really deep embedded knowledge. We were experimenting with ways to kind of make it easier to work across multiple projects, 'cause I know a lot of other firms you'll see are working on multiple projects at a time. And that's something, historically, we haven't really done, because you get so in depth, you're like living in your space with your team. You kind of live that product or whatever you're designing for that many weeks. [8391]
cause I didn't feel I had the time really, to be inspired. [8415],[8416]
Cause the other projects, the one that I would say didn't go as well, was where, it was kind of even an experiment and I was working across two projects, for the same client. It was just two projects. That one I just felt like I never really, in the right space at the right time. I was kind felt like I was always catching up on things as it went along, so that was the one I probably didn't feel was as inspiration as it could have been 'cause I didn't feel I had the time really, to be inspired. [8398]
. And we were basically, it was great, because we were sort of all empowered the make the decisions in the different areas, so I was dealing with sort of prototyping and production, all the makers, and whatnot. And then so the other guy was doing to final catch, Lucy was doing the ... So we'd throw something in and say, what do you think about this, and then we'd make the decision. [8747],[8750]
And we were basically, it was great, because we were sort of all empowered the make the decisions in the different areas, so I was dealing with sort of prototyping and production, all the makers, and whatnot. And then so the other guy was doing to final catch, Lucy was doing the ... So we'd throw something in and say, what do you think about this, and then we'd make the decision. [8723]
it was great, because we were sort of all empowered the make the decisions in the different areas, so I was dealing with sort of prototyping and production, all the makers, and whatnot. [8772],[8773]
But also, so you'd always check your decision, but at the same time, it was a group decision and you always felt like you could just make a decision on your own and that was trusted as well. [8775],[8774]
But also, so you'd always check your decision, but at the same time, it was a group decision and you always felt like you could just make a decision on your own and that was trusted as well. So if something didn't work, you'd change it, offer it out to the table, and you'd be done. So I know that doesn't really answer your question of a number. [8724],[8734]
They were quite open to it. Because again, because we ... Well, not invested, per se, because we didn't actually give them any money. Because we had a stake in equity in the company, they were quite open to it, and it got to a stage towards the end where Jim, the director, would just say to us, well, what do you think, should we do it, what do you think? [8776]
They were quite open to it. Because again, because we ... Well, not invested, per se, because we didn't actually give them any money. Because we had a stake in equity in the company, they were quite open to it, and it got to a stage towards the end where Jim, the director, would just say to us, well, what do you think, should we do it, what do you think? And we sort of became the empowered decision makers, and he'd come back to us with light ideas that some of his engineers would have, and like, what do you we think about this, are users gonna want it? [8731],[8752]
It's sort of ... The trust seemed to be there, certainly my from being in the first meeting I was, it was just three meetings down the road, the trust was sort of instilled in us in the beginning, it felt that way, at least. So seeing as we explained sort of our process and how we speak to users, and we were gonna bring in these sort of eight to 10 key users, which were in their demographic, and we'd basically just sit down, hang out, and talk to them and find out what they wanted, and test our ideas against that. [8735]
So seeing as we explained sort of our process and how we speak to users, and we were gonna bring in these sort of eight to 10 key users, which were in their demographic, and we'd basically just sit down, hang out, and talk to them and find out what they wanted, and test our ideas against that. [8778],[8777]
So they came to us, this huge bottle. It was only a nine ounce bottle, a standard bottle, but it was the size of a pint glass, and this thing was just colossally huge, and really rather phallic as well. And didn't go down a storm with the parents, when we showed them that, and we suggested that they were gonna put that in their child's mouth. [8737]
So, we sort of flagged up our concerns around this design, and they were aware of the concerns, as well. But it was a key, that was key to getting the engineering right, and then they came to us, and they were like, it sort of works now, can you make it? But it was supposed to be a [inaudible 00:23:52] but it works now, so can you make it look pretty? And we were like no. We need to change a few things. So for one, this has 15 parts, it needs to have four. So 15 is an exaggeration, but it was probably pushing close to 10. [8738]
And the fact that we wouldn't just make rash decisions, we'd contact Jim or who their engineers, and double check with them, that A, it would work, because there's no point designing something like, this wasn't the concept, this is something we want to take straightaway to market. [8782],[8781],[8779],[8780]
So we shed some parts, which they were really chuffed about, because that sheds cost. They were very cost-sensitive throughout, as well. So, yeah, so as soon as we said, oh, we're going to speak to users and see what they think, and then they were more than open, sort of trust started them. And the fact that we wouldn't just make rash decisions, we'd contact Jim or who their engineers, and double check with them, that A, it would work, because there's no point designing something like, this wasn't the concept, this is something we want to take straightaway to market. [8732],[8753]
So, yeah, so as soon as we said, oh, we're going to speak to users and see what they think, and then they were more than open, sort of trust started them [8783],[8784]
Decision makers, well I suppose we all are on our side really. We also had one main client we were dealing with. But there was also three to four of his team as well, but it was really helpful 'cause he was obviously the main decision maker and the meetings where we had ... he was the one we were talking to the whole way through. The meetings were more like our opportunity to present and convince the others that this was the right direction and luckily we were on track a lot of the time. They were happy with how we were going. It was really one key decision maker, client side. And he was passing on the information of what we'd been doing to the rest of the guys. We just used the meetings if they were concerned about something, then we'd flag it up and we'd all work on it and make sure we're happy with the decision before we left the meeting. [8386]
uckily we were on track a lot of the time. [8417]
We just used the meetings if they were concerned about something, then we'd flag it up and we'd all work on it and make sure we're happy with the decision before we left the meeting. [8418]
So I think it was a good balance sort of between us doing our work and also referencing them. [8736]
And then our side, I suppose what worked well in this team is ... 'cause we weren't, obviously we weren't all ... some of the people were doing this part-time alongside other things, because it was such a small project, we had to get such a lot done. There was several tracks of things happening at times, so for instance, there might be a business factors conversation happening with them meeting a client when I'm not there, even though I'm project managing because I have to do a design by the end of the day. There's the design element, then there was the engineering element, and these were kind of all happening together. And not all of us needed to be in all the conversations, as long as at certain points, we'd have a meeting, whether that'd be a physical meeting or email, to let everyone in the team know what was happening. If I hadn't been in this conversation, but then I had to have a meeting with the client, I still knew what had been said in that meeting. That means, we could be really productive in terms of the time, because everyone was really good about communicating in the project teams. It's really important in order for you to be able to kind of move forward quickly. I think that's what worked really well in this particular case. [8378],[8380],[8401]
Well, he came to us with something ... he's kind of an inventor guy, so he's kind of able to describe that's what he wants. [8381],[8419]
That was quite often, well, not quite often, it was often difficult because so ... Obviously originally we expected to be like sort of a skin job, so they came in with this technology, we designed the bottle, dropped it. And that wasn't to be the case, because we soon found out beyond that this thing was too big, and if it went to market size, it wasn't gonna sell. [8739]
But the brief for this particular one was good type brief because partly down to the nature of the fact that they came to us with something and knew if they wanted a direction in terms of three different strategies, from where they came to us with. In that case, it wasn't like, "What's the future of blah." It was like, "We've got this particular idea. We are convinced it's good and we want you to help us develop it." [8382],[8387]
These required ... So, it became sort of a bit of strip it back, and then redesign a bit, but the client was more than open to ... Like I said, they were aware of it, as well. So, they sort of threw an engineer our way for a few days, and we sort of liaised with him, and checked with him what we could do. And in the end we got sort of a ten percent scale reduction in volume, and decisions like this, which sort of were made quite well together. [8740]
"Okay, well, that's fine but we don't really tend ... we tend to work on broader problems than just that." And when we started looking into it, we realized that it wasn't necessary. [8420]
Whereas some of the ones in the past, like for instance, some briefs totally change as well, like I'm working on the project a while ago. It's like, "We want a new packaging shape, box." We were like, "Okay, well, that's fine but we don't really tend ... we tend to work on broader problems than just that." And when we started looking into it, we realized that it wasn't necessary. They just needed a new shape, 'cause anyone ... you can put it in any shape. You need to have a reason as to why you use that shape, if it's gonna be a good idea. And we were saying, "Well, actually, what you need is, you need to position your brand slightly differently and create a new category for yourself within this particular aisle." [8407]
But, like I say, in terms of deliverable, we knew we had to present a brand, and we knew we had to come up with a bottle, so it was quite clear from the start what it was we were doing. And then it just came down to what we could get in the time, so originally it was set up to plan the bottle and then a range of accessories, sort of bags that sterilize. And then it was clear when we had to take on this extra engineering that it wasn't gonna happen. But the client, again, was more than open to that. They were aware that this was a six week product and they were happy for us to do as much as we could in six weeks. [8748]
And so we kind of ... we gave them a new shape and everything, but we also backed it up with a lot of thinking about why this particular shape, why we think it's a good direction to move in and what they would also need to do with branding and communications in order to create the story. It was more, we think they need a new, a further in terms of helping push the brand, giving it a story, and showing that through a new packaging format, rather than just giving them a new shape. Do you see what I mean? Sometimes it's a bit more tricky. [8408]
I mean, the key thing was, after the second week, we basically nailed the key thing was the vision, so we wanted to have a great looking brand, and a great looking product, and that was the vision, so if there were a couple of engineering faults that needed to be ironed out, that was fine. The other thing was, because this was a new company, we'd be trying to design alongside their engineers, so we'd be allowing and sort of presuming that this would work. So we'd start designing, say, okay, so it has to come out of a vent, and it has this colic thing. [8720],[8741],[8754]
we'd be trying to design alongside their engineers, [8785]
It was just iterative in terms of meetings, 'cause we don't really know ourselves until we've gone out and actually seen how things are working. We'll go out and once we've figured out that it's not quite exactly as we think ... basically you've got to all the time, think about what you think the client needs and then flag it up at the next available time, whether that's over a phone call, through the meeting lined up, you just say ... we kind of pave the way for it in a lot of the presentations anyway. And then obviously the client's got to agree that they think that's the right direction you've got to be moving in 'cause otherwise they'll be upset if they come in and at the very end isn't very collaborative with the clients in terms of if we feel the brief needs to slightly change in steering into a slightly different route than ... [8399],[8396]
And they agreed to do that, that was fine, but they said, we don't know about [inaudible 00:28:22], we might need to go back to the valve. But their vision was that we wouldn't have this extra component, it would be built into the teat. So, we designed to that, and then two weeks later, they go, oh, it's fine, we spoke to the patents office and we can get away with it. [8789],[8787],[8788],[8786]
The team was a great team on this one. We worked really well together, because we were different specialisms. Or like we'd, I don't know, go and get a few printouts and put on the table and go, "What do you think, guys?" And be like, "Okay, I like this one and this one. I like this one." [8424],[8423]
The user co-creation sessions were probably the biggest source of inspiration, but also the idea we were working with was a great idea, so that helped a lot. Yeah, just the team. [8422],[8421]
What inspired us? A combination of a lot of things, really. The user co-creation sessions were probably the biggest source of inspiration, but also the idea we were working with was a great idea, so that helped a lot. Yeah, just the team. The team was a great team on this one. We worked really well together, because we were different specialisms. Or like we'd, I don't know, go and get a few printouts and put on the table and go, "What do you think, guys?" And be like, "Okay, I like this one and this one. I like this one." "Fine, make a decision and move on." So, it was very kind of quick. It produced a lot of stuff very quickly. I think that allowed us to get much further down the path, much sooner, so we could spend a lot more time on the final direction that we gave them. [8383],[8400],[8402]
So as long as we justified decisions, like I say, in terms of the scheduling and stuff, everything kind of fell bang on because we knew what we were doing and when it was gonna be there. [8790],[8749]
So, yeah, I think it's a lot of things. The client as well, he was really good at being involved and supportive of what we were doing. [8425],[8409]
the industrial designer's who's doing the CAD would email his CAD guy, and he was very sort of open, and you could sort of send anything. And if you had a question, it wasn't like, oh we need to try and work out, we don't want to lose faith, it was like, okay, let's get it sorted. [8793],[8792],[8791]
Good. He was very supportive, very willing to hear our arguments for various things, to get us involved in all different conversations that were happening, really get in the meetings in terms of ... 'cause obviously he'd be our main contact so we'd keep him in the loop about everything and then he'd be telling his team, so he's very of us in the meetings and all along really. So, yeah it was a good client relationship. [8392],[8410]
I was kind of joint ... 'cause basically, Suzy was also doing the engineering. She was kind of supporting me a bit [8426]
I was kind of joint ... 'cause basically, Suzy was also doing the engineering. She was kind of supporting me a bit, when basically there was weeks of high production, when I was very sucked into the design, she'd be there. She was basically leading the engineering conversation with him, 'cause he's much more experienced in that side of things as well and I know nothing about that side of things. Yeah, she was kind of helping doing the project management as well. [8403]
Fine. Like, Lucy's a legend anyways, so she's very ... I can't think of the word. The word's not headstrong, but she's very driven, so she knew ... We all knew that we needed a pack and a brand, and the bottle, and we knew that's what we wanted, and it was just a case of how can we get there? So I think Lucky quite often had difficulty in trying to run a project and do half of the deliverables all at the same time [8743]
Near the end, the district designer came over from Munich, so there was a few culture differences and stuff at first, [8794]
Yeah, there was no tricky relationships. Near the end, the district designer came over from Munich, so there was a few culture differences and stuff at first, but there was nothing hugely difficult. It was just what you'd expect in any normal project. [8721]
I mean, I've not been to any other offices. But I get the impression that London's a lot more laid back office than some of the other places [8795]
Well, they're self-ironing. So, if people come from different offices and different things are done differently at different offices, like, you've probably found this, like London, I think from what ... I mean, I've not been to any other offices. But I get the impression that London's a lot more laid back office than some of the other places. And we're also a lot more sort of open, so we're a lot more transparent, and we know how much money the office is making, where the money's going, what the pipeline is, what decisions have been made by partners. We're more than aware of all of this, which isn't often the case. [8744]
I think it was very good. I mean I felt it was very good. You can ask Ben. I think you're speaking to him as well. I thought ... because we were doing this kind of track, doing everything, it was quite nice 'cause you kind of could feel it, so I think the design as well, it was more like working together is very much more like that. It's not really very hierarchal, however you say that. It's not like art director type role. It's much more like with it embedded in the team in terms of the design, so we'd work together. I suppose the main core difference with the project leadership role is that you've gotta know what's happening all at the same time and make sure that everyone understands what they have to be doing in that particular time so they feel productive, 'cause we were moving so quickly. But also, making sure that we did have ... that we were very good about talking about what was going on and what happened makes people feel confident that they know what's happened to them when they're put in a situation in front of the client, they can answer questions. [8384],[8388],[8404]
that we were very good about talking about what was going on and what happened makes people feel confident that they know what's happened to them when they're put in a situation in front of the client, they can answer questions. [8429],[8428],[8430]
think it was very good. I mean I felt it was very good. [8427]
suppose it was a combination of good communication, [8431]
Anyway, very kind of relaxed, in terms of open to sharing ideas and being critical of them as well, like objective criticism, not taking offense if someone says, 'Oh, I don't really like that.' Stuff like that. [8433],[8434],[8432]
I suppose it was a combination of good communication, all the time, even with people who weren't necessarily in the space with us all the time. Kind of relaxed working environment in terms of, I get on really well with both the guys who I was working with in terms of design. Anyway, very kind of relaxed, in terms of open to sharing ideas and being critical of them as well, like objective criticism, not taking offense if someone says, 'Oh, I don't really like that.' Stuff like that. [8389],[8393]
Also, I suppose the key difference with the leadership was also you're speaking ... you're the main point of contact for the client. Making sure that if there's issues, even if it's maybe not on your track that you're working on, that you can kind of talk to these guys and take that on board and then talk to the client and get back to them so that they feel like something's been done about it, so problems don't grate or where you ... they're brought to the attention of everyone. You can just deal with them as they come. [8385],[8390],[8405],[8397]
I think if you do all that, then if it was like it's moving along and things are being dealt with rather than left to fester. [8406]
I think if you do all that, then if it was like it's moving along and things are being dealt with rather than left to fester. And then have fun as well. Have a laugh. Have music on. We have things like Disney hour. Or requesting hour, where people ... we'd have the music on, the people in the project space next to us would request songs across the wall and we'd have to play them. So, just stuff like that make it fun while you're doing it. [8394]
Reference Tags
[8719] Balanced workload pressure,[8717] Great example - Team Dynamics,[8756] Organizing effectively,[8745] Organizing effectively,[8755] Appropriate resources,[8725] Effort justification,[8715] Great example - Individual & Team outcomes for future efforts,[8757] Organizing effectively,[8716] Great example - Individual & Team outcomes for future efforts,[8758] Believes one has a hopeful path,[8759] Believes one has high agency,[8726] Effort justification,[8742] Win-win conflict about ideas,[8728] Focusing effect,[8729] Focusing effect,[8730] Focusing effect,[8760] Empathetic disposition,[8761] Creative Confidence,[8718] Stereotypical bias,[8722] Decisive leadership,[8746] Organizing effectively,[8762] Trust,[8766] Decisive leadership,[8764] Organizing effectively,[8765] Win-win conflict about ideas,[8763] Win-win conflict about relationships,[8751] Trust,[8733] Great example - Productive innovation norms,[8767] Creative Confidence,[8768] Empathetic disposition,[8411] Creative Confidence,[8769] Empathetic disposition,[8770] Anchoring,[8412] Empathetic disposition,[8379] Communicating ideas across domains,[8395] Win-win conflict about ideas,[8413] Communicating ideas across domains,[8727] Effort justification,[8771] Creative Confidence,[8414] Organizing effectively,[8391] Great example - IDEO's Methods,[8415] Lack of resources,[8416] Planning fallacy,[8398] Lack of challenging work,[8747] Organizing effectively,[8750] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[8723] Decisive leadership,[8772] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[8773] Trust,[8775] Collaborative-Creative Disposition,[8774] Trust,[8724] Decisive leadership,[8734] Great example - Productive innovation norms,[8776] Ostrich effect,[8731] Great example - External Influences,[8752] Trust,[8735] Great example - Productive innovation norms,[8778] Empathetic disposition,[8777] Listening disposition,[8737] Great example - Received feedback, actively engage with it,[8738] Great example - Received feedback, actively engage with it,[8782] Appropriate resources,[8781] Collaborative-Creative Disposition,[8779] Organizing effectively,[8780] Win-win conflict about ideas,[8732] Great example - External Influences,[8753] Trust,[8783] Empathetic disposition,[8784] Trust,[8386] Decisive leadership,[8417] Overconfidence bias,[8418] Communicating ideas across domains,[8736] Great example - Productive innovation norms,[8378] Balanced workload pressure,[8380] Communicating ideas across domains,[8401] Organizing effectively,[8381] Communicating ideas across domains,[8419] Solitude disposition when stuck,[8739] Ikea effect,[8382] Communicating ideas across domains,[8387] Decisive leadership,[8740] Ikea effect,[8420] Win-win conflict about relationships,[8407] Scope creep,[8748] Organizing effectively,[8408] Scope creep,[8720] Communicating ideas across domains,[8741] Ikea effect,[8754] Trust,[8785] Collaborative-Creative Disposition,[8399] Listening disposition,[8396] Win-win conflict about ideas,[8789] Collaborative-Creative Disposition,[8787] Communicating ideas across domains,[8788] Trust,[8786] Win-win conflict about relationships,[8424] Win-win conflict about ideas,[8423] Win-win conflict about relationships,[8422] Empathetic disposition,[8421] Listening disposition,[8383] Communicating ideas across domains,[8400] Listening disposition,[8402] Organizing effectively,[8790] Communicating ideas across domains,[8749] Organizing effectively,[8425] Organizational encouragement,[8409] Trust,[8793] Collaborative-Creative Disposition,[8792] Communicating ideas across domains,[8791] Decisive leadership,[8392] Great example - Productive innovation norms,[8410] Trust,[8426] Organizing effectively,[8403] Organizing effectively,[8743] Man blaming woman,[8794] Cultural differences,[8721] Cultural differences,[8795] Anecdotal fallacy,[8744] Organizational encouragement,[8384] Communicating ideas across domains,[8388] Decisive leadership,[8404] Promote autonomy & sense of ownership,[8429] Communicating ideas across domains,[8428] Organizing effectively,[8430] Trust,[8427] Organizing effectively,[8431] Communicating ideas across domains,[8433] Organizational encouragement,[8434] Organizing effectively,[8432] Win-win conflict about relationships,[8389] Decisive leadership,[8393] Great example - Productive innovation norms,[8385] Communicating ideas across domains,[8390] Decisive leadership,[8405] Quick resolution of relationship conflict,[8397] Win-win conflict about ideas,[8406] Quick resolution of relationship conflict,[8394] Great example - Productive innovation norms

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MADISON BARNETT
I get my inspiration from the fictional world. I’m a social geek. Completely exploit 24/365 catalysts for change whereas high standards in action items. Conveniently whiteboard multifunctional benefits without enabled leadership.
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